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Full text of "Complete pile driving rigs: catalog no. 60"

McKIERNAN -TERRY 

PILE DRIVING 
EQUIPMENT 




INTERNATIONAL 



Digitized by 
The Association for Preservation Technology International 

For the 

Building Technology Heritage Library 

http://archive.ora/details/buildingtechnoloqvheritagelibrarv 



COPYRIGHT 1949, 

McKIERNAN-TERRY 

CORPORATION 



PILE HAMMERS 
PILE EXTRACTORS 

COMPLETE PILE DRIVING RIGS 



CATALOG 60 



McKIERNAN-TERRY CORPORATION 

Manufacturing Engineers 
15 PARK ROW, NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

To the Construction Industry 3 

Important Pile Hammer Information 3 

The Complete Modern Line of Pile Driving Equipment 5 

Double-Acting Pile Hammers 7-76 

Applications and Advantages 7 

Selecting the Proper Size Hammer 7 

Illustrations of Double-Acting Pile Hammers . . 8 

Specifications 9 

Angle- Iron Guides 10 

Anvils and Base Attachments 10 

Dimensions 11 

Operating Instructions 12-13 

Lubrication Instructions 13-15 

Formula for Computing Bearing Capacity of Piles . 16 

Parts Lists 17-26 

Job Illustrations and Descriptions 27-67 

Underwater Pile Driving 68-75 

Pile Pulling 76 

Double-Acting Pile Extractors 77-82 

Applications and Advantages 77 

Specifications 79 

Parts Lists 80-81 

Job Illustrations and Descriptions 78,82 



PAGE 

Single-Acting Pile Hammers 83-108 

Applications and Advantages 83 

Specifications 86 

Dimensions 86-87 

Anvils 88 

Formula for Computing Bearing Capacity of Piles . 89 

Parts Lists 90-91 

Operating Instructions 92-93 

Lubrication Instructions 93-95 

Job Illustrations and Descriptions ... 4, 84-85, 96-108 

Pile-Driving Leads 109 

Pile-Driving Rigs 109 

Skid-Mounted Pile Driver 110 

Skid Roller-Mounted Pile Driver HI 

Skid Pile Driving Rig 112 

Turntable Pile Driver 113 

Marine Pile Driver 114-115 

Floating Pile Driver 116 

Floating Pile Driver Machinery ....... 117 

Rotating-Crane Type Wheel-Mounted Pile Driver . 118 
Rotating-Crane Type Roller-Mounted Pile Driver . 119 



INDEX OF JOB ILLUSTRATIONS 



BY TYPE OF HAMMER page 

Double-Acting Hammers 

• 28 ^ 

1 28,29 

2 29 

3 30 

5 30 

6 31,32,33,37,76 

7 33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41 

9-B-3 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 5 1, 52, 53, 

54, 55, 71 

lO-B-3 39,48,57,58,59,71 

ll-B-3 55,60,6164,65,66,67,74,75 

Other B Types . . . 40,41,42,47,50,51,56^62,63,69, 
70, 71,72,73 

Double-Acting Extractors 

E-2 82 

E-4 78, 82 

Single-Acting Hammers 

S-3 96, 97 

S-5 98, 99, 100 

S-8 101,102 

S-10 103, 104 

S-14 4, 84, 105, 106, 107, 108 

BY TYPE OF PILES 

Concrete 42, 51, 58, 62, 65, 72, 73, 100, 101, 

102, 108 



Steel H-Beams . . . 
Steel Sheet .... 
Tubular (Pipe) . . . 
Wooden 

Batter Piles (all types) 

BY TYPE OF JOBS 
Bridges 



Bulkheads 
Dams . . . 
Demolition . 
Extraction 
Foundations . 
Highways 
Piers . . . 



Railroad Pile D] 

Sewers 
Subways . 
Tunnels . 
Waterfronts . 



iving 



4, 34, 45, 54, 55, 57, 59, 60, 64, 67, 

84, 98, 99, 105, 106 
6, 30, 31, 38, 45, 46, 49, 52, 53, 56, 

61,66,69,71 76,78,82 
32,33,35,39,40,47,48,63, 

103, 104 
28, 29, 43, 44, 50, 51, 52, 64, 69, 70, 

71,73,74,75,97 

51,52, 55,57,67,97,99 



4, 39, 43, 44, 47, 48, 56, 58, 62, 65, 

71,73,74,75,84,96, 101, 103, 

104, 105, 106 
52,53,57,98 
6,38,41,46,69 
36, 37 
76, 78, 82 

30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 40, 42, 53. 70, 72 
51, 54, 59,60, 78,82,97, 100 
49, 50, 51, 55, 57, 61, 66, 98, 99, 101, 

102, 107 
39, 48, 103, 108 
28,29,54,64,82 
28, 34, 45 
63,70 
35, 38, 41. 44, 49, 50, 51, 52, 55, 57, 

61, 66, 67, 71, 75, 98, 99, 101, 107 



TO THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY 



This catalog is compiled to provide you with up-to- 
date information on pile driving equipment. It will 
show you many photographs of pile hammers in action, 
typifying the outstanding performance of McKiernan- 
Terry Hammers on important operations. This per- 
formance is the culmination of the years of experience 
behind these hammers and the result of their high 
quality. 

McKiernan-Terry Pile Hammers have been and are 
being used on a wider variety of pile hammer opera- 
tions than any other make. They are preferred by en- 
gineers and contractors all over the world for their 
uniform effectiveness and dependability. 

The McKiernan-Terry Corporation is fundamen- 
tally an engineering organization with the most mod- 
ern, well-equipped shops to produce its quality prod- 
ucts. Large and important engineering works are de- 
signed and manufactured, involving equipment that 

Bridge Operating Mechanisms Gantry Cranes 

Cable ways 

Drag Scraper Hoists 

Dredge Hoists 



requires sound design, quality and performance. 

The same high quality and worth inherent in 
McKiernan-Terry Pile Hammers characterize also the 
other important products of our extensive manufactur- 
ing facilities and our experienced engineering organi- 
zation — products that, too, have enviable records. 

Large traveling bridges for the handling of coal, ore 
and other bulk materials; equipment for the loading 
and unloading of these materials from ships; ma- 
chinery, mechanical and hydraulic, for the operation 
of dam gates and similar equipment, are continually 
passing through our plants. Marine equipment of our 
design and manufacture, to steer and anchor our Mer- 
chant and Naval ships, has an enviable reputation. We 
have supplied to our Navy some of the largest 
hydraulic equipment ever manufactured. 

Typical machinery of our manufacture includes, be- 
sides pile driving equipment: 



Coal Unloaders 

Man Trolleys and Grab Buckets 

Whirlers 

Power Blacksmith Hammers 



Level Luffing Cranes 
Lighterage Hoists 
Ore Bridges 
Steering Gears, Capstans, Windlasses, Winches 
also Special Machinery Completely Designed, Engineered and Manufactured 
and Special Machinery Manufactured from your Design 



IMPORTANT PILE HAMMER INFORMATION 



In addition to the many illustrations of McKiernan- 
Terry Pile Hammers in action, you will find in this 
volume descriptions of each of the different types of 
hammers we make, with complete technical data and 
specifications. This information should be of help to 
engineers and contractors in determining the most 
practical, speedy and economical methods of applying 
pile hammers to their requirements, and in selecting 
the hammer best suited for a given job. The many in- 
genious hammer applications shown are results of the 
originality and skill on the part of contractors, work- 



ing in cooperation with McKiernan-Terry engineers. 
We have always endeavored to keep in close touch 
with the users of our pile hammers. We desire to help 
make our hammers most profitable to their owners, as 
well as to help develop new methods to pass on to 
other users of McKiernan-Terry Pile Hammers all over 
the world. Because of this close cooperation and 
friendly relationship, we are kept informed on new 
and important projects and methods of handling them 
by many users of McKiernan-Terry Pile Driving 
Equipment. 



flLE DIIVINQ nUIPMINT 



The Complete, Modern Line of 

PILE DRIVING EQUIPMENT 



McKiernan-Terry Corporation has been building pile 
hammers for more than fifty years. Throughout this 
time the Company has consistently pioneered in orig- 
inating improvements in pile hammer design, and In 
extending the principles and applications of power- 
actuated rams to every kind of pile and to every class 
of work. 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 

Over fifty years ago, McKiernan-Terry first intro- 
duced the double-acting principle — a most important 
development in pile-driving practice. Many successive 
improvements in the design of these units have cul- 
minated in the present standardized McKiernan-Terry 
line of double-acting pile hammers described on pages 
6 to 26 of this book. 

HEAVY-DUTY PILE HAMMERS 

As foundation projects became more extensive, in- 
volving use of larger, longer and heavier piles, 
McKiernan-T^rry again led in developing heavy-duty 
double-acting pile hammers for this type of work. 
These McKiernan-Terry Hammers — the Type B — 
have relatively heavy-mass rams and low striking veloc- 
ities — but maintain high frequency of blows. 

UNDERWATER PILE HAMMERS 

Another forward step in pile hammer design — of 
outstanding importance to the engineer and contractor 
— was the development of the underwater driving 
feature of McKiernan-Terry Hammers, originated by 
McKiernan-Terry engineers. Examples of this work 
are illustrated and described on pages 68 to 75. 

DOUBLE-ACTING PILE EXTRACTORS 

Another McKiernan-Terry development was the 
"double-duty" feature of certain McKiernan-Terry 
Double-Acting Pile Hammers. This permitted both 
driving, and — by inverting the hammer — pulling^ 
with the same hammer. Then followed the develop- 
ment of the present-day McKiernan-Terry Double- 
Acting Pile Extractors, described on pages 77 to 82. 

USES OTHER THAN PILE DRIVING 

McKiernan-Terry Double-Acting Pile Hammers, in 
addition to standard pile-driving operations, have also 



been put to a wide variety of other uses with great suc- 
cess. To mention a few — 

Demolition work on brick, stone and concrete struc- 
tures and pavements. 

Knocking "skulls" and "lip skulls" out of ladles 
in blast furnaces, 

Knocking ingots out of molds in steel mills. 

Tapping and opening cast holes in blast furnaces. 

Driving keys on sow and die blocks in large forg- 
ing hammers. 

Driving metal culverts horizontally through em- 
bankments. 

Driving long tie rods horizontally for retaining 
walls, 

"Cleaning" huge locomotive tender frame castings 
by impact-produced vibration. 

SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 

During the Company's over-half-a-century experi- 
ence in the manufacture of pile hammers, McKiernan- 
Terry always recognized the value of heavy-mass rams 
at minimum velocity of blow — in feet per second at 
instant of impact — for driving heavy-mass piles in 
dense materials, where the higher frequency blows of 
double-acting hammers are of no particular advantage. 
Following a consistent policy of thorough preparatory 
work before introducing new developments, the Com- 
pany devoted many years of study and research to the 
principles and design of single-acting pile hammers 
before commencing in 1933 to build' this type of 
hammer. 

For twelve years, McKiernan-Terry built and sold a 
number of single-acting hammers, each one an im- 
provement on its predecessors, until, in 1945, the Com- 
pany was ready to present to the construction industry 
a modern, perfected, standard line of single-acting 
hammers in five sizes. These hammers, described on 
pages 83 to 95, embody the first real improvement in 
design of single-acting pile hammers in sixty years, 
permitting the handling of large, special pile-driving 
operations for which other types of single-acting ham- 
mers prove obsolete and inadequate. 

PILE-DRIVING RIGS 

In the course of its development work on hammer 
design and applications, McKiernan-Terry has also de- 
veloped various types of pile-driving rigs to meet pile 
driving operations of all known types. These rigs are 
furnished complete with leads, engines, boilers, etc., 
as described on pages 109 to 119. 



OOUBIE-ACUNG PILE HAMMERS 



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DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



McKIERNAN -TERRY 
DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



Pages 8 to 16 describe McKiernan-Terry Double- 
Acting Pile Hammers and illustrate many types of jobs 
on which they have been used. In these hammers, the 
motive power — steam or compressed air — not only 
lifts the ram, but also drives it down, thereby acceler- 
ating the speed of the down stroke. This results in a 
much heavier foot-pound blow than fall of the ram 
by gravity alone could produce. 

When piling is to be used in unstable soils, such as 
sand, silt, loam, mud, etc., it is driven faster, further 
and with less damage to the pile with a double-acting 
hammer than with any other type. This is because of 
the high-frequency, powerful blows that keep the pile 
in constant motion, thereby keeping the adjacent soil 
in agitation, which in turn reduces inertia, skin fric- 
tion and point resistance. 



McKiernan-Terry Double-Acting Pile Hammers 
may be operated with either steam or compressed air. 
Change from one power to the other can be made with- 
out need of any kind of adjustments, except change of 
lubricators and oils, as explained on pages 13 to 15. 

Simplicity, compactness, durability and fewer mov- 
ing parts than any other pile hammer are characteristic 
of McKiernan-Terry construction. All moving parts 
are entirely enclosed, hence — 

1 — They cannot injure the operator in charge, 

2 — They are protected from accidental exterior 

damage or disarrangement, 

3 — They are safe from grit and dirt — ^ever present 

on pile-driving jobs — which, by abrasive action, 
would cause rapid wear of working parts. 



SELECTING THE PROPER SIZE HAMMER 



Buyers sometimes make the error of selecting a pile 
hammer that is too light for the work to be done. 
When extra weight is not actually a disadvantage, it is 
always recommended that the hammer be selected large 
enough to drive the piling into material harder than 
is anticipated. The weight of the hammer should be 
determined not only on the basis of soil resistance, but 
also on the weight of the individual piles to be driven. 

The pile itself will absorb a part of the energy of the 
blow. Therefore, the hammer should have enough 
weight to insure sufficient surplus force to keep the 
pile in motion. It is not possible in this book to give 
close estimates of the driving capacities of the pile 



hammers, because of the wide diversity of materials 
that may have to be penetrated. However, the infor- 
mation on this subject given in the specification table 
on page 9 is the result of actual experience and can be 
of assistance in selecting the proper size hammer. 

When ordering hammers with attached angle-iron 
guides for operation in pile-driver leads, be sure to 
specify measurements A and B as indicated on the 
diagram on page 10. No charge is made for attaching 
angle-iron guides for standard leads. If holes are to be 
drilled for angle irons or any other attachment, they 
should not be located less than 21/2 inches from edge 
of hammer, nor drilled deeper than 11/2 inches. 



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DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



ATTACHING ANGLE-IRON GUIDES 



Cross-section ol 
hommer, show- 
ing method of 
attaching angle 
iron guides to 
side of Hammer 



m 



t 
^r 




H A 




FOR DRILLING ANGLE-IRON HOLES 



When ordering hammers with angle- 
iron guides attached, be sure to specify 
measurements A and B indicated 
above, adding %-inch to actual di- 
mension A and 1/2-inch to actual di- 
mension B. 



Hammer 
Number 


Size 

Stud 

Inches 


Depth 
Toppins 
Inehct 


Hol«< 
R*quir«d 


5 


¥4 


1 


16 


6 


Vt 


l'/4 


12 


7 


1 


l'/4 


16 


9-B-3 


1 


l'/4 


20 


lO-B-3 


1 


1'/4 


24 


ll-B-3 


1 


l'/4 


24 



Angle-iron guides are furnished unattached, unless 
order specifies otherwise. They will be attached at 
factory without additional charge, provided dimen- 
sions A and B, shown above, are provided. If guides 
are not required to be attached at factory, we will pro- 



vide — on application specifying hammer size — a de- 
tailed dimension print, showing exactly where and 
how to attach them. In drilling angle-iron holes be 
sure not to drill them deeper than the dimensions 
shown in table above. 



ANVILS AND BASE ATTACHMENTS 




No. B-2992. For driving one 
and/or two pieces of straight 
web steel sheet piling. 



No. B-2993. For driving one 
and/or two pieces of deep 
arch steel sheet piling. 



No. B-2994. For driving 
one and/ Or two pieces 
Z-section steel piling. 



No. B.299r. For driv- 
ing steel H-beam piles. 




No. C-1616. For pipe 
piles of all sizes. 



No. C-870. Pipe sleeve, 
diameter determined by 
dimension M, page 11. 



No. A-1943. For smooth 
butt concrete piles. 



No. A-1944. For con- 
crete piles with ex- 
tended reinforcing rods. 



Filler pieces for steel 
sheet piling or Wake- 
field wood sheet piling. 



10 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




DIMENSIONS OF McKIERNAN-TERRY DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



Size 
No. 


A 
In chat 


B 

lnch«s 


C 

Inchef 


D 
Inches 


G 


H 

Inches 


K 

Inches 


L 
Inches 


M 
Inches 


P 

Inches 


R 
Inches 


T 
inches 





20 


6 


4 


7^6 




2 74-3 '/4 








25 


4y4 


374 


1 


39 


8 


6 


5% 




2 1/4 -3 '/4 








43 


474 


iy« 


2 


29 


7/2 


6ya 


9/8 




378 


378 




4y8 


33 


578 


374 


3 


53 


9 


9 'A 


8% 




3y8 








58 


678 


23/4 


5 


51 


11 


n 


1478 




474 


474 


12 


6 


57 


9y8 


572 


6 


SS 


15 


15 


191/8 




7 


7 


16 


1174 


63 


1178 


JVt 


7 


63 


21 


16 


22% 


TJ 


7 


11 


22 


16 


73 


1478 


8y4 


9-6-3 


89 '/4 


20 


20 


233/e 


4) 


9 


9 


21 


15 


98 


i3y8 


1178 


lO-B-3 


1023/4 


24 


24 


26 y. 


11 


1 1 


25 


19 


112 


i4y8 


12 


n-B-3 


124'/2 


26 


26 


27 Va 


< 


1372 


1372 


27 


22 


13372 


}AVz 


13 



11 



DOUBU-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS 

FOR McKIERNAN -TERRY DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



A-LEADS RECOMMENDED 

The use of leads to guide the hammer in driving is 
recommended. Driving without leads usually results 
in misalignment of the hammer with the pile, causing 
excessive wear or breakage of the striking end of the 
ram and the anvil. 

Angle iron guides are furnished with each hammer 
to guide the hammer in the leads. Guides should be 
spaced one-half inch wider, back to back, than the 
width of the faces of the leads. The guides are fur- 
nished unattached, unless dimension for spacing of 
guides is specified when ordering hammer. 

Leads should be spaced one-half to three-quarters 
inch wider apart than width of hammer, so hammer 
will not bind in leads. 

B-HOSE CONNECTIONS 

The size hose specified for each hammer should al- 
ways be used. Use of a smaller size than that specified 
may result in the hammer not running up to the rated 
number of blows per minute. 

The hose should be connected to the steam inlet 
flange. Fittings, consisting of a nipple and an elbow, 
are furnished with each hammer. Universal joints for 
connecting hose to the hammer are recommended, but 
are not furnished as standard equipment. 

Before connecting hose to steam inlet, the hose 
should be thoroughly blown out with steam or air. 

The operation of the hammer will be improved if a 
drain cock or valve is installed in the steam line as near 
to the hammer as possible, so that condensed steam 
may be blown out before starting to drive each pile. 

Do not use worn out hose. Pieces of rubber or lining 
may get blown into the hammer and clog ports or 
valve. 

C-PRECAUTIONS AGAINST WEAR, DAMAGE 
AND BREAKAGE 

1. Use adequate lubrication with the right kind of 
oil. 

2. Keep hammer in line with pile. 

3. Keep full weight of hammer on pile while 
driving. 

4. Do not use excessive steam or air pressure, as it 
will cause hammer to over-stroke and lift ojff pile on 
up-stroke. 



5. Do not continue to drive on piles at refusal. Con- 
tinued driving on piles which have stopped moving 
will damage piles and break hammer parts. 

6. Do not use full power of hammer when starting 
piles or during very easy driving. 

7. Keep tie rod nuts tight. 

D-STARTING DIRECTIONS 

A cold hammer should be warmed up slowly, by 
cracking the throttle Valve and admitting steam or air 
to the cylinder, so that the hammer will run slowly and 
the ram make short strokes. In cold weather a large 
amount of steam will condense in the steam line and 
hose and inside the hammer. This condensate or water 
must be worked through the hammer before running 
hammer at full speed. 

When starting a pile and during easy driving, the 
hammer should be run slowly with short strokes, so 
that the pile will not be driven out from under the 
hammer causing damage to the tie rods and drive cap. 

The full weight of the hammer must rest on the pile 
while the pile is being driven. The hoisting line must 
be kept slack at all times while the pile is being driven, 
so that the ram will not strike the retainer and damage 
the hammer. 

Continued operation of the hammer when the full 
weight of hammer is not resting on the pile will cause 
breakage of the tie rods and separation of the piston 
from the ram. 

E-DISASSEMBLING HAMMER 

(See Pages 17 to 26 for identification of parts) 

To take apart Nos. 9-B-3, lO-B-3 or ll-B-3 ham- 
mers, remove four tie rod nuts, and lift off top head 
and top cylinder in one piece. Remove valve from top 
cylinder. Lift out cam rod. Place eye-bolt in top of 
piston. Lift piston, ram and intermediate head out of 
bottom cylinder in one piece. Do not remove piston 
or cam throw from ram unless necessary to make re- 
pairs. Reverse above operations to reassemble hammer. 

Since Nos. 0, 1 and 3 Double- Acting Hammers are 
of a very open frame construction, their disassembly 
will be obvious. 

To disassemble Nos. 2, 5, 6 and 7 Hammers remove 
the four tie rod nuts on the top head, then lift off the 
top head next, then the top cylinder. Place eye bolt in 



12 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



top of ram. Lift out ram. Next lift out middle q^lin- 
der. Next bottom cylinder, leaving the bottom head 
and anvil and four tie rods exposed. These parts can be 
taken apart by merely withdrawing the four tie rods. 

F-PACKING PISTON 

To pack the piston — square packing, Garlock #15 
or #777, is recommended. 

No. Hammer requires no packing. 

For No. 1 Hammer, use four rings of 5/l6-in. square 
packing. 

For No. 3 Hammer, use four rings of %-in. square 
packing. 

For No. 9-B-3, lO-B-3 and ll-B-3 Hammers, use 
four rings of yg-in. square packing. 

Do not use more than jour rings. 

Nos. 2, 5, 6 and 7 Hammers require no packing. 

On Nos. 1 and 3 Hammers, gland stud nuts should 
be made up evenly, so that gland will exert even pres- 
sure on the packing. Gland should compress packing 
very lightly. Packing will be kept tight by steam or 
air pressure. Severe compression will cause undue wear 
of packing and hinder free movement of the piston. 
Gland nuts must be made fast with wire to prevent 
working loose when hammer is driving. 

The packing gland in the 9-B-3, lO-B-3 and ll-B-3 
Hammers is of the self-aligning type and merely re- 
quires a complete assembly of the gland ring, gland 
spring holder pins, gland springs, gland spring holder 
and the packing, so that, when assembling the ham- 
mer, the packing will be properly aligned. There are 
no stud or gland nuts to be adjusted. 

G-CARE OF HAMMER IN TRANSIT AND 
WHEN NOT IN SERVICE 

Plug inlet and exhaust to keep dirt out of hammer. 

If hammer is to be out of service for a period under 
three months detach hose and pour one quart of oil 
down hose. Reattach hose and run hammer for several 
strokes to flush oil through hammer. Drain water 
which may have condensed in cylinder by removing 
drain plugs. Replace plugs to prevent entry of dirt. 

If hammer is to be out of service for a period over 



three months take hammer apart, dry all parts, thor- 
oughly coat them with oil and reassemble. 

H-COLD WEATHER PRECAUTIONS 

When hammer is not being used during cold 
weather, all water should be drained out of the top 
cylinder by removing drain plugs. Failure to drain 
cylinder may result in cracking of the cylinder due to 
freezing. 

I-INSTRUCTIONS FOR 
UNDERWATER DRIVING 

Cut at right shows how to 
attach the air inlet hose to 
bottom cylinder which is nec- 
essary for underwater driv- 
ing with McKiernan-Terry 
Double-Acting Pile Ham- 
mers. 

It is highly recommended 
that a lubricator he placed on 
the air line connected to the 
bottom cylinder and the same 
oil used as suggested for the 
steam line, (See section M.) 

The exhaust line must be 
carried to the surface of the 
water. Use exhaust hose of at 
least the size recommended 
in specification table page 9 ; 
but for submergence greater 
than approximately 15 feet 
use even larger hose — as 
large as possible. 

About 60 cubic feet of 
compressed air per minute 
is sufficient volume for any 
size hammer, and about l/^-lb. 
pressure for every foot of 
submergence is required. 

All hose should be kept out 
of water as much as possible, ^^.^ attached for 

and free of kinks or bends. underwater driving 




LUBRICATION -PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW CAREFULLY 



Adequate lubrication is absolutely necessary for sat* 
isfactory pile hammer operation. Insufficient oil or 
use of the wrong kind of oil causes shut-down, exces- 
sive wear and costly repairs. 



All McKiernan-Terry Pile Hammers will operate on 
either steam or compressed air. No changes, except 
in lubrication, are necessary in changing from steam 
operation to air operation* 



13 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



J-TO LUBRICATE FOR %llktA OPERATION 

A Swift Sight- Feed Lubricator for steam operation 
— see picture — is furnished with each No. 5 or larger 




Sight-feed lubricator for steam operation 

McKiernan-Terry Double-Acting Pile Hammer, but 
any standard sight-feed lubricator, if properly in- 
stalled and operated, will do. 

The purpose of the lubricator is to supply oil to the 
steam so that it is carried inside the hammer to lubri- 
cate piston and steam cylinder. The lubricator should 
be carefully installed as per directions, and must be 
kept filled and in operation while the hammer is 
running. 

K~HOW TO INSTALL STEAM LUBRICATOR 

The lubricator should be placed on the steam line 
back of the throttle valve; that is, between throttle 
valve and boiler. The connection from lubricator to 
steam line should be made through a tee, with the oil 
outlet pipe P extending into the center of the steam 
line. 

Be sure that the oil outlet pipe P extends all the way 
into the flow of steam and is at right angles to the flow. 

This is necessary so that steam passing through the 
line will carry oil in the center of the hose and not 
along the sides. 

Never mount lubricator at a bend in the steam line 
where the flow of steam will strike the oil outlet pipe P 
head-on, as this will cause lubricator to work inter- 
mittently. 

L-HOW TO OPERATE STEAM LUBRICATOR 

Close valves E and G. Remove filler plug F and fill 
oil reservoir full to very top, and replace F. The bright 



nickel-silver plate showing the sight feed O will now 
be completely covered with oil. 

Open valve E about one-half turn, then allow five 
or ten minutes, on a new installation, for steam to 
condense and form the water column. Then open 
valve G very carefully. Drops of water will commence 
to roll down over the bright plate. Each drop will 
cause a drop of oil to be forced into the steam line. 

Valve G should be regulated to give at least one 
drop of oil to every ten blows of the hammer. Avoid 
opening valve G too wide. If water runs in a stream, 
instead of in drops ^ oil will be wasted. 

When the oil in the reservoir is nearly exhausted 
water will commence to show at the bottom of sight- 
feed O, gradually rising and showing on the sight-feed 
plate. Although there will be still enough oil to run 
for some time, it is best to refill when the water shows. 

To refill reservoir, close valves E and G to shut of! 
lubricator from steam line, open I and remove plug F 
to drain off water. Then proceed to refill as above. 
When hammer is not operating, valve G should always 
be closed. 

If the lubricator is connected in such a way as to 
cause variable pressure, better results can be obtained 
by closing valve E to about the same opening as valve 
G, making the adjustment after lubricator has com- 
menced feeding. 

M-SELECT THE RIGHT OIL FOR USE 
WITH STEAM 

Steam hammers are often required to run on wet 
steam, due to unavoidable operating conditions and 
the length of steam line and hose between boiler and 
hammer. Therefore we recommend high grade com- 
pounded steam cylinder oil containing 5% to 7% ani- 
mal oil. 

Oil of this type produces an emulsifying effect when 
in contact with moisture, and the resulting lather re- 
sists the tendency of wet steam to wash oil off the in- 
ternal moving surfaces of the hammer. Oil meeting the 
following specifications has proved successful under 
average conditions: 

Gravity — degrees API 22-25 

Pour Point — degrees Fahrenheit 10-40 

Flash Point — degrees Fahrenheit 525-590 

Viscosity — Saybolt seconds at 210 degrees. . . . 120-140 
Percentage of compounded oil — usually acid- 
less tallow or lard 5%-'7% 

Typical oils meeting these specifications include 
Socony- Vacuum Gargoyle Cylinder Oil 600-W Regu- 
lar; Standard Oil of New Jersey Cylesso T-140; Texas 
Company Honor Cylinder Oil; Gulf Oil Corporation 
Crystal Cylinder Oil B. 



T4 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 





%n^ 




f ^ 




\ 




J. 3 






^^ 


H 


n 


Hin 


1 



Air lubricotor 



N-TO LUBRICATE FOR AIR OPERATION 

A Swift Sight Feed 
Lubricator to be used on 
the air line when ham- 
mer is operated on air, 
is furnished with each 
McKiernan-Terry 
Double- Acting Pile 
Hammer for sizes No. 5 
and larger. For sizes No. 
3 and smaller a regular 
line oiler is furnished. A 
Sight Feed Lubricator is 
also used on the air line 
of 9-B-3, lO-B-3 and 
ll-B-3 Hammers, con- 
ected to bottom cylinder 
when hammer is oper- 
ated in underwater driving. Note underwater instruc- 
tions, seaion L 

0-HOW TO INSTALL AIR LUBRICATOR 

The lubricator should be placed on the air line, back 
of the throttle valve; that is, between throttle valve 
and air receiver or compressor. The connection from 
lubricator to air line should be made through a tee, 
with the oil outlet pipe extending into the center of 
the air line. 

Be sure that the oil outlet pipe extends all the way 
into the flow of air and is at right angles to the flow. 

Illustration shows correct method of installing lu- 
bricator in air line so that air passing through the line 
will carry oil in the CENTER of the hole and not 
along the side. 

Never mount lubricator at a bend in the air line 
where the flow of air will strike the air outlet pipe 
head-on, as this will cause lubricator to operate inter- 
mittently. 

P-HOW TO OPERATE AIR LUBRICATOR 

Close valves A and B. Remove cover C and fill oil 
reservoir. Replace cover C and open valve B. Then 
open valve A very carefully and regulate it to give at 
least one drop of oil to every ten blows of the hammer. 
When lubricator needs refilling, close valves A and B, 
remove cover C and repeat above operation. 

It is necessary that a steady supply of oil be fed into 
the air line whenever hammer is in operation. Opera- 
tion without oil for even a brief period may cause seri- 
ous damage to the hammer. 



Q-OILS FOR AIR OPERATION 

The oils recommended for steam operation should 
not he used when the hammer is operated on air, be- 
cause they are too heavy and sticky unless heated by 
steam. Oil of approximately the following specifica- 
tions is recommended for air-driven hammers: 

Gravity — degrees API 17-28 

Pour Point— degrees Fahrenheit to -10 

Viscosity — Saybolt seconds at 210 degrees. . . 48-60 

Percentage of compounded oil to 3% 

The following brands of oil have been used success- 
fully in air-driven hammers: Socony- Vacuum Gar- 
goyle D.T.E. Heavy Medium; Gulf Oil Corporation 
Harmony Oil D or Seneca Oil B; Texas Company Ursa 
Oil C; Standard Oil of New Jersey Teresso 52. 

R-OILS FOR UNDERWATER DRIVING 

Hammers operate on very wet steam under water, 
due to the cold water in contact with the steam hose 
and outside surfaces of hammer. This causes steam to 
condense, with the result that a large amount of water 
is carried along with the steam. 

This excess water makes it necessary to use a cylin- 
der oil containing 10% to 12% compound animal oil, 
in order to insure that oil will adhere to the moving 
parts. 

Socony- Vacuum Gargoyle P. E. Cylinder Oil Dark 
and similar oils containing 11% compounded lard 
have proved successful and are recommended for 
underwater use. 

S-INTERNAL LUBRICATION 

Oil reservoir A at top of valve and oil reservoir B 
in the face of the steam cylinder should be kept filled 
with the oil recommended above. Reservoir A oils 
the valve. Reservoir B 
oils the cam rod bear- 
ings, cam rod, and cam 
throw. 

As the oil in these 
reservoirs drips out 
steadily, whether the 
hammer is in opera- 
tion or not, the reser- 
voirs should be com- 
pletely filled at start of 
driving, and refilled at 
least every hour the 
hammer is in operation. 




15 



^ ^^[ie^/wwt-^t^ 



DO« 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



FORMULA FOR COMPUTING BEARING CAPACITY 

OF PILES DRIVEN BY DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



The "Engineering News" formula which is given 
below is generally used by engineers to determine the 
bearing capacity of piles driven with McKiernan-Terry 
Double-Acting Pile Hammers. 



L = 



2E 



S + .l 
In this formula, 

L = Safe bearing capacity in pounds. 

E = Energy, or foot-pounds per blow. 

S = Set, or penetration, in inches per blow. - 

.1 ^ Constant. 
The assumed safety factor of this formula is 6. 

The following illustration of the use of this formula 
is based on running a 9-B-3 Hammer 145 strokes per 
minute, and developing an 8,750-foot-pound blow. 

2 X 8750 



L — 



S + .l 



Attention is called to the fact that the energies here- 
with published for the 9-B-3, lO-B-3 and ll-B-3 Ham- 
mers are not the usual "Rated Energies", but are the 
actual foot-pound blows at the various speeds listed. 
These data are obtained by very careful calibration of 
these hammers and determined by exhaustive tests, not 
only by indicator diagrams, but also by high speed 
moving picture apparatus, which actually determines 
the velocity of the ram at the point of impact. 

Calculations based on gauge pressures in the field 
are misleading, because no two "setups" are identical, 
and it is impossible to determine the Mean Effective 
Pressure in the working cylinder from the boiler pres- 
sure as shown by the gauge, but figures given in table 
below for sizes Nos. 6 and 7 are based on indicator 
card readings taken at the factory, and for sizes 9-B-3, 
lO-B-3 and ll-B-3, both indicator card data as well 
as velocities of ram at impact are used to determine 
their foot-pound blow at various strokes per minute. 



Size of 


Weight of 

Ram 

Pounds 


Lifting Area of 

Piiton 
Square Inches 


Striking Area of 

Piston 

Square inches 


Length of 
Strolce 
Inches 


FOOT-POUNDS BLOW AT 
GIVEN STROKES PER MINUTE 


No. 


Strokes 

per Minute 


Fool- Pounds 
per Blow 


6 


400 


36.18 


36.18 


83/4 


f 275 
] 230 
[ 200 




f 2,500 
2,160 
1,680 


7 


800 


55.6 


55.6 


9'/2 


f225 

\ 195 
[ 170 


f 4,150 
] 3,720 
[ 3,280 


9-6-3 


1,600 


40.85 


56.75 


17 


(145 
J 140 
1 135 
I 130 


( 8,750 

8,100 

1 7,500 

i 6,800 


1 0-B-3 


3,000 


58.91 


78.54 


19 


f 105 

100 

1 95 

[ 90 


f 13,100 
1 12,000 
] 10,900 
i 9,550 


n-B-3 


5,000 


75.40 


95.03 


19 


f 95 
1 90 

1 S^ 
[ 80 


f 19,150 
1 18,300 
1 17,500 
[ 1 6,700 



BEARING CAPACITY OF PILES DRIVEN BY McKIERNAN-TERRY 
DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



Using "Engineering News" formula L 



2 E 



S + .1 



where E is foot-pounds per blow developed at nor- 
mal number of strokes per minute shown in specifi- 
cation table on Page 9. 



Penetration 
per blow 
Inches (S) 


BEARING CAPACITY OF PILES IN|g|pPOUND$ 


No. 7 


No. 9.B.3 


No. 10-B-3 


No. n-B-3 


.1 
.2 
.3 


41,500 
27,666 
20,750 


87,500 
58,333 
43,750 


131,000 
87,333 
65,500 


191,500 

1 27,666 

95,750 


.4 

.5 
.6 


1 6,600 
13,833 
11,857 


35,000 
29,166 
25,000 


52,400 
43,666 
37,428 


76,600 
63,833 
54,714 


.7 
.8 
.9 

1. 


1 0,375 
9,222 
8,300 
7,545 


21,875 
19,444 
1 7,500 
1 5,909 


32,750 
29,111 
26,200 
23,818 


47,875 
42,555 
38,300 
34,818 



14 



16 



No. 



01 

02 

04 

05 

08 

010 

015 

016 

017 

019 

020 

021 

023 

024 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




PARTS LIST FOR NO. O PILE HAMMER 

No. Pile Hammer Code Word— ORFOR 



Name 



Top Head 

Cylinder . . . 

Piston 

Piston Bearing 

Step 

Chest Cover. ........ 

Va Ive . 

Valve Chest 

Chest Stud and Nut. . . 
Inlet Valve Handle . . . 
Inlet Valve Spring . . . . 
Inlet Valve Handle Pin. 

Oil Plug 

Side Rod 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



AHAHT 

AHALF 

AHAMA 

AHANE 

AHAPI 

AHARO 

AHASU 

AHATY 

AHBAR 

AHBES 

AHBIT 

AHBOX 

AHBUY 

AHCAS 



No. 



025 
045 
046 
047 
048 
049 

050 

051 
052 



054 



Name 



Side Rod Nut 

Inlet Valve 

Spring Stop 

Front Head 

Anvil 

Front Head Cap, for 2-in. 

sheeting 

Front Head Cap, for 3-in. 

sheeting 

Front Head Cap Bolt 

Front Head Cap and Step 

Bolt 



Front Head Bushing . 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



AHCET 

AHCIX 
AHCOY 
AHCUZ 
AHDAT 

AHDEX 

AHDIH 
AHDOZ 

AHDUL 

AHECH 



Hammer can be supplied for either 2-inch or 3-inch wood sheeting. 



17 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




PARTS LIST FOR NO. 1 PILE HAMMER 

No. 1 Pile Hammer Code Word— OPLAS 



No. 



Name 



No. 
Req^. 



Code 
Word 



No. 



Name 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



100 
101 
102 

103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 

112 



Bail 

Side Rod 

Top Head Spring 

Top Head 

Cylinder 

Bottom Head 

Base Block 

Base Block Cap* 

Base Block and Nut 

Step 

Ram 

Bottom Head Split Ring — 

2 pieces 

Piston Rod Packing 5/l6 sq. 

Rings 



— 4 



ABFAF 

ABFEP 

ABFIR 

ABFOS 

ABFUT 

ABGAP 

ABGER 

ABGIS 

ABGOT 

ABGUX 

ABHAR 

ABHES 

ABHIT 



113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 



Packing Sleeve — 2 pieces 

Packing Sleeve Gland 

Anvil 

Chest Cover Stud and Nut 

Chest Cover 

Valve Buffer 

Valve Washer 

Valve 

Valve Chest . 

Chest Stud and Nut 

Cylinder Stud and Nut 

Anvil Block Guide Bolt and Nut 

Base Block Distance Piece 

Side Rod Nut 



ABHOX 

ABHUY 

ABIGT 

ABIHZ 

ABILS 

ABINA 

ABIPE 

ABIRI 

ABISO 

ABITU 

ABIVY 

ABJAS 

ABJET 

ABJIX 



*Can be supplied for either 2-inch or 3-inch wood sheeting. 



1^ 18 



/ 




ra=^ 




■219 




'209 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




~r^ 



No. 

200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
209 
210 
21 1 



PARTS LIST FOR NO. 2 PILE HAMMER 

No. 2 Pile Hammer Code Word — OPLET 



Name 

Top Head 

Tie Rod Nut 

Tie Rod Washer . 

Top Cylinder 

Middle Cylinder 

Bottom Cylinder 

Bottom Head 

Anvil 

Tie Rod (right and left). 

Ram 

Piston Ring 



No. 
Req. 

1 

4 
4 



Code 
Word 

ABMAY 

ABMEZ 

ABMIA 

ABMOB 

ABMUC 

ABNAZ 

ABNEG 

ABNIB 

ABNOC 

ABNUD 

ABOBU 



No. 



21 

21 

21 

21 

21 

218 

219 

220 

222 

223 



Name 

Chest Cover Stud and Nut. 

Chest Cover 

Valve Washer. 

Valve 

Valve Chest 

Chest Stud and Nut 

Pulling Plug 

Driving Plug 

Valve Bushing (2 pieces) . . 
Lifting Handles 



No. 

Req. 

4 
2 
2 
1 
1 

4 
\ 
1 



Code 
Word 

ABOCY 

ABOGN 

ABOHF 

ABOSP 

ABOTZ 

ABOVA 

ABOWE 

ABOXI 

ABPAB 

ABPEC 



NOTE: When ordering Tie Rods (part No. 209} be sure to specify whether right or left side, front or back, (looking toward valve chest). See diagr< 
obove. 



19 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



324- 

30Q- 



303- 

301- 
31B- 
3EE- 




-£□1 



m [& 



o) O 



to cpi 



tol 



o 



o 




PARTS LIST FOR NO. 3 PILE HAMMER 

No. 3 Pile Hammer Code Word— OPLIX 



No. 



Name 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



No. 



Nome 



No. 

Req. 



Code 
Word 



300 
301 
302 
303 
304 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
310 
311 



Bail 

Side Rod 

Top Head Spring 

Top Head 

Cylinder 

Bottom Head 

Base Block 

Base Block Cap 

Base Block Bolt and Nut 

Step 

Ram 

Bottom Head Split Ring- 
2 pieces 



ABTAE 

ABTEF 

ABTIG 

ABTOH 

ABUBA 

ABUCE 

ABUDI 

ABUFO 

ABUGU 

ABUHY 

ABULT 

ABUMP 



312 

313 
314 
315 
316 
317 
318 
319 
320 
321 
322 
323 
324 



Piston Rod Packing, % sq. — 4 

rings 

Packing Sleeve — 2 pieces 

Packing Sleeve Gland 

Anvil 

Chest Cover Stud and Nut 

Chest Cover 

Valve Buffer 

Valve Washer 

Valve 

Valve Chest 

Chest Stud and Nut 

Cylinder Stud and Nut. . 

Side Rod Nut 



1 
1 
1 

4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 

4 
4 
4 



ABUSK 

ABU2N 

ABVAH 

ABVEI 

ABVIK 

ABVOL 

ABWAG 

ABWEK 

ABV/IL 

ABXAK 

ABXEL 

ABXIM 

ABXON 



20 



No. 



500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
509 
510 
511 
512 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




PARTS LIST FOR NO. 5 PILE HAMMER 

No. 5 Pile Hammer Code Word— OPLUZ 



Name 



Top Head 

Tie Rod Nut 

Tie Rod Washer 

Top Cylinder 

Middle Cylinder 

Bottom Cylinder 

Bottom Head 

Anvil . 

Tie Rod (2 right and 2 left). 

Ram 

Piston Ring 

Chest Cover Stud and Nut. . 



No. 
Req. 



1 

4 
4 



4 
1 

2 
4 



Code 

Word 



ACABT 

ACACS 

ACAFZ 

ACAGA 

ACAKI 

ACALO 

ACANY 

ACARB 

ACBAM 

ACBEN 

ACBIC 

ACBOP 



No. 



513 
514 
515 
516 
517 
518 
524 
525 
526 
527 
528 



No 



Chest Cover . ., 

Valve Washer 

Valve Buffer 

Valve 

Valve Chest. 

Chest Stud and Nut. . 

Valve Cage 

Movable Valve Seat. 

Spring 

Spring Stop 

Steel Ball 



No. 
Req. 



2 
2 
2 

1 
1 

4 
2 
2 
2 
2 



Code 
Word 



ACBUK 

ACCAN 

ACCEO 

ACCIP 

ACCOR 

ACCUS 

ACDAF 

ACDEP 

ACDIR 

ACDOS 

ACDUT 



NOTE: When ordering Tie Rods (part No. 509} be sure to specify whether right or left side, front or back, (looking toward valve chest). 



21 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




PARTS LIST FOR NO. 6 PILE HAMMER 

No. 6 Pile Hammer Code Word— OPMAT 



No. 



600 
601 
602 
603 
604 
605 
606 
607 
609 
610 
611 
612 
613 



Name 



Top Head 

Tie Rod Nut 

Tie Rod Washer 

Top Cylinder 

Middle Cylinder 

Bottom Cylinder 

Bottom Head. 

Anvil 

Tie Rod (interchangeable). . . 

Ram 

Piston Ring 

Chest Cover Set Screw and Nut 
Chest Cover 



No. 
Req. 



1 

4 
4 



4 
1 

2 
2 
2 



Code 
Word 



ACFAP 

ACFER 

ACFIS 

ACFOT 

ACFUX 

ACGAR 

ACGES 

ACGIT 

ACGOX 

ACHAS 

ACHET 

ACHIX 

ACHOY 



No. 



614 
615 
616 
617 
618 
619 
620 
621 
624 
625 
626 
627 
628 



Name 



Valve Washer 

Valve Buffer 

Valve 

Valve Chest 

Chest Stud and Nut . 

Pulling Plug 

Driving Plug 

Dowel , 

Valve Cage 

Movable Valve Seat 

Spring 

Spring Stop 

Steel Ball 



No. 
Req. 



2 
2 

1 

1 

4 
1 
1 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



Code 
Word 



ACHUZ 

ACICK 

ACIDZ 

ACIFT 

ACIPA 

ACIRE 

ACISI 

ACITO 

AGWY 

ACIXS 

ACJAT 

ACJEX 

ACJIH 



L 



22 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



p/r^. 




@ 



CROSS SECTION 
OF LEFT SDE OF 

TOP CYLINDER 




-7D9 




ii^t^'X'^'^''^^^^^ '^^^'^'^''^ 



PARTS LIST FOR NO. 7 PILE HAMMER 

No. 7 Pile Hammer Code Word— OPMEX 



No. 



700 

701 

702 

703 

704 

705 

706 

707 

708 

709 

710 

711 

712 



Name 



Top Head 

Tie Rod Nut 

Tie Rod Washer 

Top Cylinder 

Middle Cylinder 

Bottom Cylinder 

Bottom Head 

Anvil (flat) 

Anvil (bell bottom) 

Tie Rod (2 right and 2 left). 

Rom 

Piston Ring 

Chest Cover Set Screw and 
Nut 



No. 
Req. 



1 

4 
4 



Code 
Word 



ACLEZ 

ACLIA 

ACLOB 

ACLUC 

ACMAZ 

ACMEG 

ACMIB 

ACMOC 

ACMUD 

ACNAB 

ACNEC 

ACNID 

ACNOE 



No. 



713 
714 
715 
716 
717 
718 
719 
720 
721 
724 
725 
726 
727 
728 



Nome 



Chest Cover 

Valve Washer 

Valve Buffer 

Valve 

Valve Chest 

Chest Stud and Nut. 

Pulling Plug 

Driving Plug 

Dowel 

Valve Cage 

Movable Valve Seat. 

Spring 

Spring Stop 

Steel Ball 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



ACNUF 

ACOBO 

ACOCU 

ACODY 

ACOKS 

ACOLM 

ACOPH 

ACORF 

ACOST 

ACOWA 

ACOXE 

ACOZI 

ACPED 

ACPIE 



NOTE: When ordering Tie Rods {part No. 709) be sure to specify whether right or left side, front or back, (looking toward valve chest) See 
diagram above. 



23 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




PATENTED 

M^KERNANTERRY CORP 

NEW YORK 
USA. 




©MnletJ 
OIL ^""^ 








Part 



PARTS LIST FOR NO. 9-B-3 PILE HAMMER 

No. 9-B-3 Pile Hammer Code Word— OPNOD 



Req. 



Code 

Word 



Part 
No. 



No mo of Port 



No. 
R«q. 



Code 
Word 



1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 



Top Head 

Top Head Stud and Nut 

Valve Cover 

Valve Cover Stud and Nut (Front). 
Valve Cover Stud and Nut (Rear). 

Tie Rod Nut 

Top Head Gasket 

Tie Rod 

Top Cylinder 

Valve 

Oil Plug 

Valve Ring 

Com Rod Bearing Thrust Washer . . 

Oil Pocket Cop 

Cam Rod Bearing 

Drain Plug 

Intermediate Head 

Dowel Pin 

Bottom Cylinder 



AFJIA 

AFJOB 

AFJUC 

AFKAZ 

AFKEG 

AFKIB 

AFKOC 

AFKUD 

AFLAB 

AFLEC 

AFUD 

AFLOE 

AFLUF 

AFMAC 

AFMED 

AFMIE 

AFMQF 

AFMUG 

AFNAD 



1919 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



Air Inlet Plug 

Cam Rod 

Cam Throw 

Com Throw Taper Pin 

Bottom Head 

Anvil (Flat) 

Anvil (Bell Bottom) 

Anvil Retdiner — 2 pieces 

Piston 

Piston Ring 

Gland Ring — 2 pieces 

Gland Spring Holder Pin 

Gland Spring 

Gland Spring Holder — 2 pieces 

Packing 

Ram Guide 

Ram Guide Nut 

Ram 

Rom Taper Pin 



AFNEB 

AFNUH 

AFOBE 

AFOCI 

AFODO 

AFOFU 

AFOGY 

AFOLK 

AFONS 

AFORL 

AFOZA 

AFPAE 

AFPEF 

AFPIG 

AFPOH 

AFRAJ 

AFREI 

AFRIK 

AFROL 



NOTE: Do not use more than 4 rings of ^-inch square packing 



24 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMEDS 



^^ 



^ 



M'KERNAN-TERRY CORP 

NEW YORK 
USA 



fexHAUSTj 





PARTS LIST FOR NO. 10-B-3 PILE HAMMER 

No. 10-B-3 Pile Hammer Code Word— OPNIZ 



Port 
No. 



Nam* of Part 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



Port 
No. 



Nome of Port 



No. 


Code 


Req. 


Word 


1 


AFVUP 


1 


AFWIC 


1 


AFWOP 


1 


AFWUK 


1 


AFXAN 


1 


AFXEO 


1 


AFXIP 


1 


AFXOR 


1 


AFXUS 


1 


AFZAG 


1 


AFZEK 


6 


AFZIL 


6 


AFZOM 


1 


AFZUN 




AGAHK 


1 


AGALA 


1 


AGAME 


1 


AGANI 


1 


AGAPO 



2000 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
201 1 
2012 
2013 
2014 
2015 
2016 
2017 
2018 



Top Head 

Top Head Stud and Nuf 

Valve Cover 

Valve Cover Stud and Nut (Front) 
Valve Cover Stud and Nut (Rear) 

Tie Rod Nut 

Top Head Gasket 

Tie Rod 

Top Cylinder 

Valve 

Oil Plug 

Valve Ring 

Cam Rod Bearing Thrust Washer. 

Oil Pocket Cap . . . 

Cam Rod Bearing 

Drain Plug 

Intermediate Head 

Dowel Pin . 

Bottom Cylinder 



1 

6 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 

4 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 

2 
2 
3 
1 

2 
1 



AFTAK 

AFTEL 

AFTIM 

AFTON 

AFTUR 

AFUBZ 

AFUFA 

AFUGE 

AFUHt 

AFUKO 

AFULU 

AFUMY 

AFUNK 

AFURD 

AFUSH 

AFVAL 

AFVEM 

AFVIN 

AFVOK 



2019 
2022 
2023 
2024 
2025 
2026 
2027 
2028 
2029 
2030 
2031 
2032 
2033 
2034 
2035 
2036 
2037 
2038 
2039 



Air Inlet Plug 

Cam Rod 

Cam Throw 

Cam Throw Taper Pin 

Bottom Head . 

Anvil (Flat) 

Anvil (Bell Bottom) 

Anvil Retainer 

Piston . 

Piston Ring 

Gland Ring — 2 pieces 

Gland Spring Holder Pin 

Gland Spring 

QIand Spring Holder — 2 pieces 

Packing 

Ram Guide 

'Ram Guide Nut 

Ram 

Ram Taper Pin 



NOTE: Do not use more than 4 rings of yi-inch square packing. 



25 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




^fKERNA^J-TERRr CORP 

NEW YORK 
USA. 



v^ 





PARTS LIST FOR NO. 11-B-3 PILE HAMMER 

No. n-B-3 Pile Hammer Code Word— OPNEY 



Part 
No. 



2100 
2101 
2102 
2103 
2104 
2105 
2106 
2107 
2108 
2109 
2110 
2111 
2112 
2113 
2114 
2115 
2116 
2117 
2118 
2119 



Nome of Port 



Top Head . . . . 

Top Head Stud and Nut 

Valve Cover 

Valve Cover Stud and Nut (Front) 
Valve Covw Stud and Nut (Rear). 

Tie Rod Nut 

Top Head Gasket 

Tie Rod 

Top Cylinder. . 

Valve 

Oil Plug 

Valve Ring 

Cam Rod Bearing Thrust Washer. 

Oil Pocket Cap 

Com Rod Bearing 

Drain Plug 

Intermediate Head 

Dowel Pin 

Bottom Cylinder 

Air Inlet Plug 



Req. 



Code 
Word 



AFAMI 

AFANO 

AFARY 

AFASB 

AFHIZ 

AFAPU 

AFHOD 

AFCAP 

AFAZT 

AFDAR 

AFEGT 

AFDES 

AFDOX 

AFEHZ 

AFHUB 

AFELS 

AFBAF 

AFESO 

AFBEP 

AFENA 



Port 
No. 



2122 
2123 
2124 
2125 
2126 
2127 
2128 
2129 
2130 
2131 
2132 
2133 
2134 
2135 
2136 
2137 
2138 
2139 
2140 
2141 
2142 



Name of Part 



Cam Rod 

Cam Throw. 

Cam Throw Taper Pin. 

Bottom Head 

Anvil (Flat) 

Anvil (Bell Bottom) 

Anvil Retainer . 

Piston 

Piston Ring .... 

Gland Ring — 2 pieces 

Gland Spring Holder Pin 

Gland Spring 

Gland Spring Holder — 2 pieces 

Packing 

Ram Guide 

Ram Guide Nut . 

Ram 

Ram Taper Pin 

Sheave 

Sheave Bushing 

Sheave Shaft 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



AFDIT 

AFDUT 

AFFUZ 

AFBIR 

AFBOS 

AFBUT 

AFHAX 

AFCER 

AFCIS 

AFGIH 

AFGOZ 

AFGEX 

AFGAT 

AFCOT 

AFETU 

AFEVY 

AFCUX 

AFIBK 

AFFAS 

AFICF 

AFID5 



NOTE: Do nof use more than 4 rings of ^-inch square packing. 



26 



DOUBtE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



McKIERNAN-TERRY 
DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 

ON THE JOB 



The pages immediately following will show you 
photographs of a few of the innumerable pile-driving 
projects which McKiernan-Terry Double- Acting Pile 
Hammers have helped make successful. They picture 
work done with McKiernan-Terry Hammers ranging 
from the 2-foot high 105-pound McKiernan-Terry 
No. up to the 11-foot high 14,000-pound McKiernan- 
Terry No. ll-B-3. 

The settings of these pictures show not only domes- 
tic scenes but also foreign and distant places, such as 
Europe, South America, Egypt, India, Japan, etc. 

Furthermore, the pile-driving jobs pictured are 
similarly varied, from driving light 2-inch by 8-foot 
wood sheeting up to reinforced concrete piles 90 feet 
in length, and in some instances 24 inches in diameter. 
Also steel pipe piles 36 inches in diameter and up to 



110 feet in length, as well as tubular steel caissons 71/2 
feet in diameter — to mention merely a few shown. 

Unusual pile-hammer uses will show you, for ex- 
ample, a hammer operating horizontally — actually 
on its back — see page 35 ; pile hammers used to raze 
buildings — pages 36 and 37; six big double-acting 
pile hammers pounding away at one time on the same 
project — page 6. 

But the best part — the practical part — of this 
collection of pictures is that they show what important 
work McKiernan-Terry Double- Acting Pile Hammers 
have been doing all these years. You will see many 
jobs with which you may be already familiar. And you 
will probably see pile hammer applications which may 
be useful to know about in handling difficult pile- 
driving problems of your own. 



27 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



HANDY TIME-SAVERS DRIVING SMALL PILES 




Brooklyn, N. Y. One of five 
McKiernan-Terry No. Dou- 
ble-Acting f^le Hammers driv- 
ing wood sheeting for the 
Fulton Street subway, soving 
time and labor. 





Great Neck, N. Y. McKiernan-Terry No. and No. 1 
Double-Acting Pile Hammers used to drive wood sheet- 
ing in laying a sewer. A total of 7,000 feet of 2-inch 
X 8-inch sheeting 25 to 32 feet long were driven through 



sandy loam, stone, gravel and clay mixture. The No. 
Hammer was used to drive an average of 180 pieces 
2-inch X 8-inch x 20-feet to a maximum penetration of 
two feet. Then No. 1 Hammers were substituted. 



28 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



QUICKER, BETTER AND CHEAPER THAN MAULS 




29 



DOUUI-ACTING PIIE HAMMERS 



ON THE BANKS 
OF THE THAMES 



England. McKiernan-Terry No. 3 Double- 
Acting Hammer driving steel sheet piling 
for the foundation of a 12,000-ton capaci- 
ty oil storage tank 120 feet in diameter. 
Sheet piling used to form a complete ring 
around the foundation to prevent soft 
ground from spreading under the weight 
of tank and contents. 




DRIVING SHEET PILES 
WITHOUT A DERRICK 

New York City. Four McKiernan-Terry No. 
5 Double-Acting Hammers were used to 
drive 9-inch steel sheet piling for coffer- 
dams in the construction of the Savoy 
Plaza Hotel. A special attachment, sliding 
in the pile groove, permitted use of the 
hammers without a derrick. This device 
provided a firm guide, keeping the ham- 
mer directly in line with the piling and 
permitting every blow to be delivered with 
full force on the interlock of two sheets 
driven simultaneously. The cofferdams 
were excavated later and filled with 



30 




M^ 



Xtt 
I- ui 

M 

OCX 

Oh- 

;2< 



1*1 1 i 



t Q. 

IS 



£ 

^0 



*2 4: S^ 



-Q ^ -D *a^ 
g^ g S *". 
Q '5. CD c ■ 

6 « D .? o 

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2^ » X IE i- 

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o ^ w ^ «_ 

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SSo 



-a -S 

c J} 






C4 *" t; 

- o y S 

3 M tt O 

► •£ of)Q 

■» £ C N 

! » S P 

: i Sit 




DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



TANDEM TEAM FOR BIG CAISSONS 




New York City. Bank of the Manhattan Co. Building, Wall 
Street. McKiernan-Terry No. 6 Double-Acting Hammers driving 
44-inch cylinder caissons to 32 feet penetration through sand 
and hard pan. For 3 of these cylinders, 2 hammers in tandem 
were used, regulated to strike in unison. The special driving 
head consisted of a short pipe section with reinforcing bands 
riveted top and bottom. Picture at lower left looks down into 
the cylinder. Spencer, White & Prentis, Inc., contractors. 



32 



DOUBIE-ACTING PIIE HAMMEIS 



OVER A FOOT PER MINUTE FOR Z'A HOURS 







New York City. Dodge Building. One No. 
6 and two No. 7 McKiernan-Terry Double- 
Acting Hammers were used to drive some 
300 15-inch open end pipe piles. One of 
the No. 7 hammers, with a crew of three 
men, drove 547 feet of pipe in 7V2 hours. 
Photo at left shows pipe being cleaned out 
with the compressed air used to operate 
hammers. Spencer, White & Prentis, Inc., 
contractors. 



33 






DOUBIE-ACTINO PILE HAMMERS 




HELPING TO SPEED 

RELIEF FOR 

STRAP HANGERS 



New York City. Extending the Lexington 
Avenue subway stations. McKiernan-Terry 
No. 7 Double-Acting Hammer driving steel 
H-beam supports down through street sur- 
face. Johnson, Mason & Hanger, 
tractors. 



34 



OOUBIE-ACTINC PILE HAMMHS 




UNUSUAL USES FOR 
PILE HAMMERS 



(Left) Buffalo, N. Y. McKiernan-Terry No. 7 Double-Acting Hammer 
dfriving tubular piles for underpinning foundations of the center 
wing of the Millard Fillmore Hospital. Because of the scant head- 
room, a special driving rig was devised. A total of 38 piles, vary- 
ing in length from 15 to 22 feet, were placed, 21 being driven 
through existing concrete footings. Driven to refusal with the No. 
7 Hammer, they were driven to further refusal with a heavier 
McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B-2 Hammer. Handled by Raymond Concrete 
Pile Co. 

(Below, left) Mid-western war plant. While engaged in vital war 
work, the building began to show signs of settling. Without in- 
terruption of plant operation, McKiernan-Terry No. 7 Double- 
Acting Hammers were used to install essential underpinnings. 
With very little headroom, the hammer, suspended by a heavy 
chain hoist, drove 12-inch tubular steel piles through existing 
spread footings under the building. After cylinders had been 
excavated and filled with concrete, structural steel beams and 
wedges transferred the column loads to these cylinders. Spencer, 
White & Prentis, Inc., contractors. 

(Below, right) Staten Island, N. Y. Installation of new steel bulk- 
head at the shipyards of Bethlehem Steel Co. Operating in hori- 
zontal position, McKiernan-Terry No. 7 Double-Acting Hammers 
drove 3V2-inch steel tie-rods through cinder fill under shipways in 
operation. The rods connected with steel H-beam deadmen more 
than 100 feet away. George W. Rogers Construction Co., con- 
tractors. 




35 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



SAVING TIME ON DEMOLITION 




New York City. McKiernan-Terry No. 7 Double-Acting 
Hammer used in demolition of a two-story concrete 
garage. The hammer was substituted for ordinary wreck- 
ing methods because of the need of saving time on the 
demolition contract. Job was completed in 25 working 
days— in less time and at less cost than was originally 



estimated. Previous demolition attempts, using a heavy 
steel ball, had proved ineffective as well as dangerous. 
An 18-inch length of pipe, fastened to the anvil, pro- 
vided a shattering blow. This was removed in tearing 
down the curtain walls, which were straddled by the legs 
of the hammer. Spencer, White & Prentis, inc., contractors. 




36 



DOUtlE-ACTINC PILE HAMMERS 



PLAYING SAFE ON DEMOLITION 



(Right) Quaeniboro, N«w York City. McKiernan-Terry No. 6 Doubla- 
Acting Hammer breaking up matonry in the removal of an old 
aqueduct to install new tewer. This aqueduct, 13 x 10 x 137 feet, 
built of brick and concrete, finished outside with concrete blocks, 
was in such excellent condition that hammer drills were not effec* 
tive. Explosives could not be used because a temporary water line 
was too close by. A long 4-inch diameter chisel attached to the 
hammer, supported by a special cap fitted over the hammer base, 
broke out the granite and matonry fill in mass. 

(Below) New York City. McKiernan-Terry No. 7 Double-Acting 
Hammer demolishing a concrete column on wrecking fob. Spencer, 
White & Prentis, Inc., contractors. 





37 



DOUBIE-ACTINC PILE HAMMERS 



PILE DRIVING IN THE NILE 



Egypt. Constructing the Nag Hommadi Barrage to 
counter^balance the lowering of the river caused by 
the Gebel Aulia Dam. McKiernan-Terry No. 7 Double- 
Acting Hammers, operating from pendulum leads on o 
floating pile-driving plant, drove 10,000 tons of steel 
sheet piling for the barrage. The leads traveled along 
a runway supported by two pile*driving frames mounted 
on a pontoon. By this means 15 piles could be driven 
without moving pontoon. The sheet piling ranged from 
35 to 40 feet in length and was driven to a penetration 
of 17 feet. After driving from the pontoons was finished, 
the hammers were moved ashore to drive the permanent 
piling for the droined area. Later an Inverted No. 7 
Hammer pulled the temporary piling, handling some 
5,000 piles in 3 weeks. Sir John Jackson, Ltd., contractors. 




DOUSIE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 











■\. 



MODERNIZING A 
RAILROAD BRIDGE 



De Cew Falls, near St. Catherines, Ontario. 
McKiernan-Terry No. 7 Double-Acting Ham- 
mer driving pipe piles in the reconstruction 
of the Canadian National Railways bridge 
across 12-Mile Creek, completed without 
interruption of railway traffic. Another 
McKiernan-Terry Double-Acting Hammer, a 
No. 10-B-3, shown lying on ground at right 
in the lower picture, was used for the fmal 
feet of driving. Upper picture shows tfie 
new, slenderer, concrete-cased piers built 
around the piles, replacing the previous 
open frame construction. Contractors, C. 
A. Pitts, General Contractor, Ltd, 



39 












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FAST WORK ON PIPE PILES 

New York City. McKiernan-Terry No. 7 and No. 9-B-2 Double-AcHng Hammers driving pipe piles 
through fill and old peat bog in constructing a New York Edison Company service station. A total 
of 13,000 feet of 60-foot piling was driven in 1 week. Spencer, White & Prentis, Inc., contractors. 



40 




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DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



DEPENDABLE EVEN 
WITH NATIVE LABOR 



Kobe, Japan. McKiernan-Terry B-type Dou- 
ble-Acting Hammer driving 18-inch rein- 
forced concrete piles 40 feet long for a 
foundation project. Even when using na- 
tive labor, unfamiliar with machinery, 
McKiernan-Terry Hammers ore found to 
stand up and deliver dependable service. 




42 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



ARMY ENGINEERS 
WORK FAST 



Wesel, Germany. McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B- 
3 Double-'Acting Hammer^ mounted on a 
"rhino" used by U. S. Engineers to con- 
struct the Robert Ooutdin Bridge across 
the Rhine during the invasion of Germany. 
This 2200-foot bridge was completed in 
10 days, 5 hours. See also page 44. 



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DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



RESTORING WARTIME WRECKAGE 




44 



OOUSIE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



MID-WEST SUBWAY 
JOB SPEEDED 



(Left) Chicago, lU. McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B-3 Double- 
Acting Hammer driving H-beam steel {liles in the con- 
struction of Chicago's subway. Peter Kiewit Sons Co., 
controctor. 

(Below) McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B-3 Double-Acttng Ham- 
mer driving 70-foot steel sheet piling for the Chicago 
subway's deepest open cut excavation, the Clark Street 
metzanine station. For the final 20 feet of driving a 
heavier McKiernan-Terry No. 11-8-3 Hammer was used. 
Kenny-McHugh, sub-contractor. 




DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



DRIVING 190-FOOT PILES FOR GIANT DAM 



Fort Peck, Mont. McKiernan-Terry No. 9- 
B-3 Double-Acting Hammer used in driving 
steel piling for the Fort Pock Dam, largest 
earth-filled dam in the world. Piles 100 
feet long were handled by a 115-foot gan- 
try traveling on a 25-foot gauge track. 
Contractors, Fraxier-Davis Construction Co. 
and G. L. Tarlton. 




46 



TUBULAR PILES IN FAST AND WEST 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



Batavia, N, Y. McKiernan-Terry 
No. 9-B-3 Double-Acting Hammer 
driving tapered, fluted mono- 
tube piles. Bero Engineering 
ond Construction Co., contractors. 




Near Barstow, Calif. McKiernan-Terry B- 
type Double-Acting Hammer driving mono- 
tube piles for bridge over Mojave River. 



47 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




TAPERED 

MONOTUBE PILES 

FOR BRIDGE 

SUPPORT 



(Above two pictures) Spring Lake, Mich. 
McKiernan-Terry No. 10-B-3 Double-Acting 
Hammer driving extra-long, tapered, fluted 
monotube piles in constructing new high- 
way bridge to replace old bridge indicated 
in background. Driven to a minimum bear- 
ing of 40 tons each, the 75-foot piles, with 
20-foot extensions, in place varied from 
60 to 120 feet. Contractor, Luedtke Engi- 
neering Co. 

(Right) Calicoon, N. Y. McKiernan-Terry 
No. 9-B-3 Double-Acting Hammer driving 
11 -inch tapered monotube piles for Erie 
Railroad bridge. Parker & Graham, con- 
tractor. 




48 



DOUBll-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




OBSTRUCTION GETS DRIVEN, TOO 



Lake Ontario, Canada. McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B-3 Dou- 
ble-Acting Hammer used in reconstructing the Burlington 
Pier, about 20 miles west of Toronto. 997 interlocking 
sheet steel piles, 26 to 36 feet in length, were driven 
to completely enclose the old 850-foot wharf. A "pants" 
device, see photo at right, aligned the suspended ham- 
mer firmly and perpendicularly with pile, unaffected by 
slackness of line and block above. 2 or 3 feet of stone 
filling, washed from old structure, had to be penetrated, 



then 6 or 8 feet of sand and gravel, followed by soft 
clay and finally stiff clay, into which piles were driven 
2 to 3 feet. At one place two piles, driven by an older 
hammer, were stopped 6 feet down by some obstruction, 
presumably a big boulder. When the McKiernan-Terry 
9-8-3 was substituted, the obstruction was driven some 
8 feet deeper down, where it cracked open, admitting 
the piles, which went down freely for at least 3 feet. 
Contractor, Bermingham Construction. 



49 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



A FEW INCHES 

AWAY FROM 

A TUNNEL 



Jersey City, N. J. McKiernan-Terry No. 9- 
B-2 Double-Acting Hammers used in con- 
structing Erie Railroad pier No. 9. The job 
required 17-inch to 21 -inch wood piles, 82 
to 120 feet in length which were driven 
to 2 feet under water. In a single 8-hour 
day, one of these hammers placed 75 piles, 
spotting them 14 inches from the side of 
the Holland Tunnel. 9,200 timber piles in 
all were driven, a few of which are shown 
in lower photo. Foley Brothers, contractors, 




50 



DOUBLE-ACTING PtLE HAMMERS 




HANDLING HEAVY 
CONCRETE SHEETING 



(Left) Brooklyn, N. Y. McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B-3 Double-Acting 
Hammer driving 20-inch square tongue-and-groove concrete sheet- 
ing for the extension of Flatbush Avenue across Jamaica Bay. 
Driving was through hard, fine sand with overlying strata of clay 
to a penetration of 38 feet. A timber follower was fastened into 
recess in anvil and fitted with guides to ride in the pile driver 
leads. A renewable wood driving block, set easily between re- 
inforcing rods, struck piles squarely in center and prevented 
damage to concrete. George B. Sf earin, contractor. 



BATTER PILES 
DRIVEN WITHOUT LEADS 



(Two illustrations below) Staten Island, N. Y. McKiernan-Terry 
B-type Double-Acting Hammers driving batter piles for one of 
twelve 1000-foot piers. The rigging used abolished need of a pile- 
driver frame, enabling driving^ in places inaccessible to floating 
or ordinary land rig. A 4-foot pipe sleeve, bolted to jaws of ham- 
mer, held pile in place for driving. See close-up at left. A 3-point 
suspension kept the hammer fixed at any desired angle. This 
unique rigging, according to the city inspector in charge, permitted 
the driving of 2 piles to every 1 driven with drop hammers in 
batter leads. A total of 92 long batter piles were driven in a 
single B-hour day— a pile every 5 minutes. Contractors, Terry & 
Tench. 




51 



DOUBIE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 

LAKEFRONT BULKHEADS - RIVERFRONT FLOOD WALLS 







(Above) Chicago, III. McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B-3 
Double-Acting Hammer driving baUer piles for 
bulkheads for causeway to Northerly Island in 
Chicago Park District. Contractors, N. S. Mackie Co. 

(Right) Cairo, III. McKieman-Terry No. 9-B-3 
Double~Acting Hammer driving steel sheeting for 
a TVz-mile cellular-type flood wall, to be flanked 
with levees. Part of the 20-mile chain of walls 
and levees protecting Cairo against Mississippi 
River floods. Profect of U. S. A. Corps of Engi- 
neers, Ottinger Bros. Construction Co., contractors. 



52 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



FILTRATION PLANT PROJECT 




Chicago, III. McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B-3 Double-Acting Hammer driving steel sheet piling 
for the South District Filtration Plant. Top picture, bulkheads being driven. Lower picture, 
piling for south wing wall. FitzSimons & Connell Dredge & Dock Co., contractors. 




53 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




H- BEAMS REINFORCE 
SEVERED ROADWAY 



Queensboro, New York City. McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B-3 
Doubte-Acting Hammer driving 40-foot, 12-inch x 14- 
ineh steel IH-beam piling through a 6-lane concrete high- 
way in excavating for the Queens Corridor Sewer proj- 
ect. H-beams were necessary to reinforce a diagonal 
cut through the busy boulevard, where the concrete 
roadway had to be speedily removed to minimize inter- 
ruption of traffic. Hendrickson Bros. Inc., contractors. 



54 



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DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



BRIDGE-BUILDING IN ARIZONA 




Topock, Ariz. McKiernan-Terry No. TO-B-2 Double-Acting Hammers driving semi-circular double- 
wall cofferdams into cemented volcanic gravel and boulders, in the construction of the Santa 
Fe Railroad bridge shown in foreground of upper picture. Kansas City Bridge Co., contractor. 




56 




TWO WAYS TO DRIVE BATTERS 



Chicago, III. McKiernan-Terry No. 10-B-3 Double-Acting 
Hammer driving steel batter piles from fixed steel leads 
on a lakefront improvement project. The two photos 
above show Z-piling bulkhead walls being driven; lower 
photo, H-beam batter-protecting piles. Great Lokes 
Dredge & Dock Co., contractors. 



San Vicente, Chile. McKiernan-Terry No. 10-B-3 Double- 
Acting Hammer driving heavy H-beam batter piles from 
short hanging leads with "pants", in the construction 
of a new pier for Corporacion de Fomento de la Pro- 
duccion. Contractor, Frederick Snare Corporation. 



57 



DOUBLE-ACTtNG PILE HAMMERS 




BRIDGE BUILT 
THE FAST WAY 



West PoinJ, Va. McKiernan-Terry No. 10- 
B-3 Double-AcHng Hammer in a steel 5- 
pile guide, driving pre-cast concrete piles 
in bents of five at one setting for bridge 
across the Mattaponi River on Virginia 
State Highway 33. The deck of reinforced 
concrete was pre>cast in 40-foot lengths 
and laid in sections. See upper photo. 
Diamond Construction Co., contractors. 



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DOUBLE-ACTING PIIE HAMMERS 



TO SPEED UP HOLLYWOOD TRAFFIC 



Hotiywood, Calif. McKiernan-Terry No. lO-B-3 Double-Acttng Ham- 
mer, in swinging leads, driving steel H-beam piles for the foun- 
dation of a 4-ievel overpass on the Hollywood Freeway. Con- 
tractors, Jomes L Barnes Co. 




59 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



GRADE SEPARATION PROBLEM SOLVED 




Hollywood, Calif. McKiernan-Terry No. TT-B-3 Double-Acting 
Hammer driving steel H-beam piles for a grade separation 
on Hollywood Freewoy. Peter Kiewit Sons Co., contractor. 




60 




DOUBLE-ACTtNG PILE HAMMERS 




HEAVY HAMMER 

WITH SPECIAL 
"PANTS" GUIDE 

Toledo, Ohio. McKiernan-Terry No. 11-B-3 
Double-Acting Hammer driving MZ-38 steel 
sheet piling for one of the new piers of 
the Lakefront Dock & Railroad Terminol 
Co. at the mouth of the Maumee River. 
These piers will make coal loading facili- 
ties more accessible for lake vessels. Con- 
tractors, Walsh-Bates & Rogers Construc- 
tion Co. 




61 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




BRIDGING 
THE RED RIVER 
IN TEXAS 
PANHANDLE 



Estelline, Tex. McKiernan-Terry B-type 
Double-Acting Hammer driving concrete 
piles for the 2553-foot bridge across the 
Red River on the Colorado-to-Gulf High- 
way. A total of 401 piles were driven to 
an average penetration of 23 to 35 feet, 
through quicksand, gravel, and frequently 
through several feet of shale. Id. Abbott, 
contractor. 



DOU81E ACTING PilE HAMMERS 



DRIVING GREAT STEEL CYLINDERS 



Oakland, Calif. Two views showing McKiernan-Terry B-type Doubte- 
Acting Hommer driving 7-foot 6-inch steel cylinders 105 feet long 
to exact grade in construction of the Oak land- Alameda Estuary 
Vehicular Tube. These caissons were toter excavated from within, 
pumped clear of water, and used as housing for concrete piers, 
built to exact grode and alignment. Cylinders were then removed. 
Diagram shows special anvil arrangement employed. {See also 
page 70.) California Bridge & Tunnel Co., contractors. 




mmw^ 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



DRIVING FROM A LENGTHENING TRESTLE 





I 




El Segundo, Calif. McKiernan-Terry No. 11-B-3 Double- 
Acting Hammer used in constructing the Hyperion sub- 
marine outfall sewer, stretching a mile into the Pacific, 
serving the City of Los Angeles. The hammer was oper- 
ated from a pile driver running on rails along a timber 
work trestle. Only a short section of the trestle had been 
completed when these photos were made. Timber piles 
for the trestle and steel H-beam$ for the pipe footing 
and for a cofferdam to protect the 12-foot reinforced 
concrete sewer piping were both handled by this 11-B-3 
hammer. Guy F. Atkinson Co., contractor. 




^f 



64 





DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



CONCRETE PILES FOR BRIDGE APPROACH 




Wildwood, N. J. McKiernan-Terry No. T1-B-3 Double-Acting Hammer driv- 
ing 20-inch concrete piles for the approach to the Great Channel Bridge 
between Wildwood and Cape May. Contractors, Brann & Stuart Co. 




..sift' " 



65 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



HARD DRIVING, HEAVY PILES 




Jacksonville, Fla. McKiernan-Terry No. 11-B-3 Double-Acting Hammer driving steel sheet piles 
for the municipal dock on the St. John's River. The job required 3600 lineal feet of 12-inch 
piling, with every 6 sheet piles separated by immense master pile. The 45-foot sheeting was 
driven to about 42 feet penetration through sand, mud, clay, phosphate, etc. The master 
piles, 55 feet long, were driven to about 52 feet penetration. Contractor, C. E. Hillyer. 



66 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



DRIVING EXTRA-LONG 
STEEL PILES 



San Francisco, Calif. McKiernan-Terry No. 11-6-3 Double-Acting 
Hammer driving vertical and batter H-beam steel piles at the 
Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard. The piles ranged from 140 to 165 
feet in length. Ben C. Gerwick, Inc., contractors. 




67 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



UNDERWATER PILE DRIVING 



For many years, pile-driving under water was always 
difficult and expensive. Great skill and precaution 
were required, and the results were sometimes not en- 
tirely satisfactory because of the difficulty of determin- 
ing accurately the bearing capacity of piling driven 
under water by means of "followers" or long piles 
that had to be subsequently cut off below water. 

In recent years, McKiernan-Terry has revolutionized 
this type of work by successfully adapting McKiernan- 
Terry Hammers for driving under water. The follow- 
ing pages show underwater driving methods that have 
been widely adopted by contractors. 

On one of the very first jobs where McKiernan-Terry 
underwater hammers were used, the contractor stated 
that the total cost of driving piles by this method was 
less than the former cost of sawing alone. It is not 
surprising, therefore, that on the strength of this ad- 
vantage a great demand for McKiernan-Terry under- 
water hammers was established and has existed ever 
since. It has now been demonstrated that piles can be 
driven under water, even to depths of 80 feet or more, 
almost as easily as on land. 

All B-type McKiernan-Terry Double-Acting Ham- 
mers and all McKiernan-Terry Single- Acting Hammers 
are as adaptable for underwater work as for driving 
on land or above water. The only requirement is that 
compressed air be supplied to the bottom cylinder of 
the hammer by means of an air hose connected as 
shown in diagrams on page 13 for the double-acting 
hammers and on page 93 for the single-acting ham- 
mers. 

Approximately 60 cubic feet of compressed air per 
minute at one-half pound pressure per foot of sub- 
mergence is sufficient to prevent water from entering 
the bottom cylinder to interfere with the reciprocating 
action of the ram. For greatest efficiency the exhaust is 
carried from the hammer to the surface through a 
large-diameter hose. The motive fluid operating the 
hammer may be either steam or compressed air. 



With a movably retained, but unyielding, anvil rest- 
ing on the pile, and with the driving ram of the ham- 
mer working in a cylinder from which the surrounding 
water is completely excluded, the full force of the blow 
of the ram is exerted on the pile. Consequently the 
driving efficiency is the same as if the work were being 
done above the surface, and the bearing capacity of 
the piles can be determined as above the surface. 

McKiernan-Terry Underwater Pile Hammers elim- 
inate the use of "followers", a feature appreciated by 
engineers. They also practically eliminate submarine 
sawing. This is because piles may be driven so close to 
grade in most cases that no sawing is necessary. This is 
especially important in cofferdams, where the bracing 
formerly made pile sawing very difficult and expensive. 

Compared with older methods of driving piles 
under water, the advantages of using McKiernan- 
Terry Underwater Pile Hammers may be summed up 
as follows: 

Shorter piles can be driven — with less waste of 
timber. 

Followers are eliminated — full force of blow de- 
livered directly to pile. 

Bearing power is determined as on the surface. 

Piles are driven straight. 

Piles can be spaced accurately. 

No delays on account of high water. 

Divers not required, except for inspection or oc- 
casional sawing. 

When sawing becomes necessary it is made easier, 
as only short sections need be sawed off. 

"Blows" in cofferdams are eliminated. 

Foundation piles can be driven in large and deep 
cofferdams before unwatering — thus preventing 
disturbance of ground materials by hydrostatic 
pressure existing when cofferdams are un- 
watered before piles are driven. 

McKiernan-Terry Corporation owns the patents in 
the United States and foreign countries for underwater 
pile-driving apparatus covering double-acting, single- 
acting and drop hammers. 



m 



68 



DOUBIE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



FOR AN OHIO RIVER 
LOCK AND DAM 



Kentucky. McKiernan-Terry B-type Double- 
Acting Hammer used in constructing Dam 
No. 47 in the Ohio River. Some 3000 
round foundation piles, 26 to 31 feet 
long, and 2000 steel sheet piles, 20 to 
30 feet long, were driven. A cofferdam 
2200 feet long, parallel to river bank, 
enclosed the entire work. Part of the 
driving was in hard pan, which o water 
[et would not penetrate, but the 
McKiernan-Terry Hammer drove both the 
round and sheet piles without difficulty. 
The sheet piles were driven two at a 
time to grade. Despite frequent necessary 
moving of the barge, up to 40 bearing 
piles 31 feet long ^vere driven per 8- 
hour day, to grade 20 feet below water 
level. 



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69 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



\ 



60-FOOT PILES 
40 FEET 

UNDER WATER 







i 



Alameda, Calif. McKiernan-Terry No. 9- 
B-2 Double-Acting Hammer driving 60- 
foot timber piles under water for the 
foundation of the Alameda portal 
building of the Estuary Vehicular Tunnel 
between Alameda and Oakland. The 
hammer first drove 525 of these piles to 
exact grade from 34 to 40 feet below 
the surface. Then, with 90-foot extension 
leads added, the hammer drove 1200 
more piles 80 feet beneath the surface. 
An average of 26 piles were driven per 
7 hours. Another McKiernan-Terry B-type 
Hammer drove heavy steel sheeting and 
large steel cylinders on this job. (See 
page 63.) California Bridge & Tunnel Co., 
contractors. 



f^ iMttn 



70 




A^2 



\ 




DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



TO SUPPORT A LOCK 
THROUGH A LEVEE 



(Left) East Atchafalaya Basin, la. McKiernan-Terry 
No. 9-B-2 Double-Acting Hammer driving 72- to 78-foot 
timber piles under water to support the concrete Bayou 
Sorrel Lock through the basin protection levee. This lock 
forms a link that permits boat traffic to the Gulf Intra- 
coastal Waterway, via Morgan City. R. Thomas McDer- 
mott & Co., Inc., contractors. 



INGENIOUS METHOD OF 
UNDERWATER DRIVING 



(Below) Daytona Beach, Fla. McKiernan-Terry No. TO-B-3 
Double-Acting Hammer drove 1,982 timber piles, aver- 
aging 38 feet long, 12 to 20 feet under water, for the 
foundations of the 1,777-foot Halifax River Bridge. A 
heavy steel H-pile spud, pointed at the bottom, was used 
in place of leads. A [acket of steel plate, fitted to the 
hammer, rode on guides running between the H-pile 
flanges. The spud, when lowered, penetrated the bottom 
sufficiently to hold accurate position while pile was 
lowered and hammer placed. The 4,000 steel sheet piles 
forming the bridge's 78 cofferdams were driven by a 
McKiernan-Terry No. 9-B-3 Double-Acting Hammer. Con- 
tractors, Tidewater Construction Corp. 



Ml 



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9Hc9(£e/man'7e^ 

DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



62,000 FEET OF CONCRETE PILING 




Hine, Mo. McKiernan-Terry B-type Double-Acting Hammer driving 48- to 68-foot reinforced concrete 
piles under water for the foundation of the Howard Bend Water Works plant for the City of 
St. Louis. The tops of these piles came to rest 30 feet below the surface. Other McKiernan- 
Terry Double-Acting Hammers, Nos. 6 and 7 were used to drive, and later pull, the steel sheet 
piling used for the cofferdam. Contractors, Frazier-Davis Construction Co. See also page 31. 










'^^^m^^^^^m 



72 



DOUBIE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




NO BREAKAGE, NO SAWING 



Denmark. McKiernan-Terry No. TO-B-2 Double-Acting 
Hammer driving 12-inch square concrete piles and 70- 
foot timber piles 27 to 46 feet below water level for 
piers for a Danish State Railroads bridge. These piles 
were driven in 50 feet of water, through gravel, sand 
and hard blue clay. Driving was done from a floating 
frame 40 feet high, with telescopic leods 78 feet long. 



These leads could rest on the bottom while the big piles 
were being driven. No breokage of concrete pile heads 
occurred. The use of followers was unnecessary and 
underwater sawing of timber piles practically eliminated, 
as most piles were driven close to grade. The contractor 
stated that the total pile-driving cost was less than pre- 
vious cost of sawing alone. 



73 



DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




PILE TOPS 40 FEET UNDER WATER 



Bayonne, N. J. McKiernan-Terry No. 11-6-3 Double- 
Acting Hammer used in constructing the Jersey Central 
Railroad bridge across Newark Bay from Bayonne to 
ElizabetKport. The job included 72 piers built in coffer- 
dams which rested on piles driven to within two or three 
feet of the compact sand and gravel bottom. Piles were 
40 to 45 feet long with 12- to 14-inch butts. At low 



\A^ater the pile tops were about 40 feet below the sur- 
face. Two McKiernan-Terry Hammers operated in 85-foot 
leads supporting 70-foot telescopic leads. Piles were 
drown up into a bell anvil and secured at the bottom by 
knives, which disengaged after the first few hammer 
blows. Some of these piles were driven in as little time 
as 3 to 5 minutes. Contractors, J. Rich Steers, Inc. 



74 



i' 



DOUBIE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




EAST AND WEST COAST UNDERWATER JOBS 



(Left) Brooklyn, N. Y. McKiernan-Terry No. 11-6-3 
Double-AcHng Hammer with telescopic leads driving 
piles under water for the extension of Wallabout Basin 
at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Dry Dock Associates, con- 
tractors. 

(Right) Portland, Ore. McKiernan-Terry No. ll-B-3 
Double-Acting Hammer driving 40- to 50-foot piles for 
the Willamette River Bridge. About 800 of the 1000 



piles used were driven under water. The river was 
80 feet deep, with sand and coarse gravel bottom. 
The piles were driven 25 to 32 feet. The main leads, 
extending 40 feet below the surface, were 110 feet 
long with 70-foot telescopic leads. Piles were secured 
at bottom by knives, as in large photo on opposite 
page. Average driving time, 25 minutes per pile, in- 
cluding placing in leads, securing, lowering and driving. 
Pacific Bridge Company, contractors. 



75 



9Hc9(i€Anan'7e^ 

DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



TURNED UPSIDE DOWN— THEY PULL 




Pulling piles with inverted McKiernan-Terry Double-Acting Pile Hammers. Lef^— No. 6 Hammer 
pulling 14-inch arch web steel piling, using standard rig shown at right of page. Cenfer— Pulling 
sheet piling 44 feet long, concreted to a depth of 41 feet— without difficulty. Right— Special pulling 
rig, used in England, made of steel bars with grips to pile webs. 



Cable pulling rig commonly in 
use. Can be furnished for Nos. 
5, 6 and 7 McKiernon-Terry Dou- 
ble-Acting Pile Hammers. 



USING HAMMERS TO PULL PILES 

Many years ago McKiernan-Terry pioneered the use 
of inverted pile hammers for pulling piles. Fitted with 
suitable rigging to go between crane or derrick hook 
and the piling to be pulled, the hammer, turned upside 
down, delivers powerful upward blows, that are ef- 
fective in dislodging stubbornly set piling. This use 
of McKiernan-Terry Hammers has been standard prac- 
tice throughout the world ever since first introduced. 
About twenty years ago, however, McKiernan-Terry 
began designing extractors, whose sole purpose was to 
pull piles. Now supplied in two standard sizes, 
McKiernan-Terry Double-Acting Pile Extractors are 
shown and described on the pages immediately fol- 
lowing. 



McKIERNAN-TERRY CABLE PULLING RIG PARTS 
For Nos. 5, 6, and 7 Hammers 



Part 
No. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



Name 



Crane Sling 

Grooved Saddle Block 

Retaining Ring 

Pile Sling 

Clips 

Pile SMng Bolt and Nut 

Pile Clomp 

Pile Bolt and Nut 

Half Sheave (single) , . 

Half Sheave (double).. 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



ADPAD 

ADPEB 

ADPIF 

ADPOG 

ADPUH 

ADRAE 

ADRIG 

ADROH 

ADSAH 

ADSEI 



Note: When ordering parts be sure to specify whether for No, 5, 6, or 7 Pile Hammer 

Port Nos. 5, 9 and 10 not used on No. 5 Pile Hammer. 

Pulling Rig, complete, for No. 5 Pile Hammer ORNOB 

Pulling Rig, complete, for No. 6 Pile Hammer OROZU 

Pulling Rig, complete, for No. 7 Pile Hammer ORRUF 



76 






PILE EXTRACTORS 



McKIERNAN -TERRY 
DOUBLE-ACTING PILE EXTRACTORS 



"We have known for a long time that a McKiernan- 
Terry Hammer will drive any piles that can be driven. 
We have learned that a McKiernan-Terry Extractor 
will pull them out." This is an unsolicited statement of 
a well-known pile-driving contractor. 

Over forty years ago, a progressive contractor dis- 
covered that a McKiernan-Terry Double- Acting Ham- 
mer could -be operated in an inverted position and 
would then extract steel sheet piling more rapidly and 
with less expense for rigging than by any other means 
then available. This method of extracting piles is still 
in common use, but as much more piling is being ex- 
tracted today than ever before, a distinct need has 
developed for a self-contained extractor which could 
be put immediately into use without special rigging. 

To meet this need, McKiernan-Terry Corporation 
designed its double-acting pile extractors years ago. 
These extractors follow the same mechanical principles 
that are used in McKiernan-Terry Pile-Driving Ham- 
mers, and after thorough tests on various kinds of 
pulling work they were offered to the trade and 
quickly won the enthusiastic approval of users. 

Both the E-2 and E-4 McKiernan-Terry Pile Ex- 
tractors are built ruggedly to stand up under the severe 



service imposed by this kind of work. In addition to 
exceptional power and sturdiness, their design includes 
the means necessary for quickly connecting up to the 
pile, placing it where desired after extraction, and dis- 
connecting the pile without loss of time. 

The high frequency and energy of the sharp un- 
cushioned blows of a McKiernan-Terry Pile Extractor 
vibrates and loosens the most stubbornly set piling. 

Economical extraction of piling is dependent upon 
the combination of vibration, caused by a heavy up- 
ward blow, and a continuous pull on the member to 
be removed. For the average light extracting job the 
E-2 Extractor is recommended ; but for longer, heavier 
and more stubbornly set piling, the E-4 Extractor 
should be used. The E-2 Extractor is designed to with- 
stand a crane pull up to 50 tons and the E-4 Extractor 
up to 100 tons. 

As an illustration of McKiernan-Terry Extractor ef- 
ficiency, reports have been submitted by users to the 
effect that these Extractors have successfully pulled 
piling that could not be removed with other and much 
larger types of pile extractors. 

Tables listing the principal characteristics of both 
Extractors will be found on Page 79. 



TJ 



PtLE EXTRACTORS 



BENT, CRIMPED PILES PULLED WITH EASE 




Chicago, III. McKiernan-Terry No. E-4 Pile Extractor 
pulling steel sheet piling used in construction of the west 
abutment of the Harlem Avenue Viaduct. This piling had 
been driven through 40 feet of hard clay and 5 feet 
of boulder-filled wet sand down to solid rock. In many 



instances the bottom ends of the piles were found 
split, bent and crimped. "The majority of these piles," 
to quote the contractor, "simply walked out of the 
holes. Even bent and crimped pieces came out with 
surprising ease." Contractor, E. J. Albrecht Co. 



78 



PILE EXTRACTORS 



No. E-2 Extractor 



No. E-4 Extractor 



SPECIFICATIONS OF McKIERN AN -TERRY DOUBLE-ACTING PILE EXTRACTORS 



EXTRACTOR SIZE 



Net weight of extractor and attachment, pounds 

Weight of ram, pounds 

Bore, inches 

Stroke, inches 

Energy per blow, foot pounds 

Blows per minute 

Width overall, inches 

Depth overall, inches 

Length overall, inches , 

Diameter of pile clamp bolt, inches 

Width of standard pile clamp, inches 

Air consumption, cubic feet per minute, actual . . 

Boiler horsepower 

Hose connection, inches . 

Maximum crane pull, tons 

Code word for Extractor 




Steam or air pressure should not exceed 1 25 lbs. gauge pressure 



79 



PILE EXTRACTORS 




PARTS LIST FOR NO. E-2 PILE EXTRACTOR 



No. E-2 Pile Extractor Code Word — PULAT 



Pari 
No. 



Name 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



Port 
No. 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



E.201 
E-202 
E.203 
E-204 
E-205 
E-206 
E-2 07 
E-208 
E-209 
E-2 10 
E-211 



Top Head 

Tie Rod 

AnviJ 

Cylinder 

Side Strap 

Side Strap Guide Bolt and Nut 

Ram 

Chest Cover Stud and Nut. . . 

Chest Cover 

Chest Stud and Nut 

Valve 



PULOX 

PULSA 

PULTE 

PULUZ 

PULVI 

PULWO 

PULZY 

PUPAX 

PUPBO 

PUPCU 

PUPDY 



E-212 
E-213 
E-2 14 



215 

216 

217 

218 

219 

E-220 

E-221 

E-222 



Votve Chest. , . 
Piston Ring . , 
Bottom Head . . 
Tie Rod Nut , . 

Yoke 

Yoke Pin 

Pile Clamp Pin. 

Spacer 

Pile Clamp .... 
Pile Clamp Bolt. 
Taper Pin 



PUPEZ 

PUPIB 

PUPOC 

PUPUD 

PUPWA 

PUPXE 

PUPZt 

PURAZ 

PURBI 

PURCO 

PURDU 



80 



PILE EXTRACTORS 




PARTS LIST FOR NO. E-4 PILE EXTRACTOR 

No. E-4 Pile Extractor Code Word— RABAL 



Porf 
No. 



No. 
Req. 



Code 
Word 



Pari 
No. 



No. 
Req. 



Cod* 
Word 



E-401 
E-402 
E-403 
E-404 
E-405 
E-406 
E-407 
E-408 
E-409 
E-4 10 
E.41 I 
E-4 12 
E-4 13 



Top Head 

Tie Rod 

Anvil 

Cylinder 

Side Strop 

Side Strop Guide Bolt and Nut. 

Rom 

Chest Cover Stud and Nut 

Chest Cover 

Chest Stud and Nut 

Valve 

Valve Chest 

Piston Ring . . 



RABEM 

RABIN 

RABKA 

RABLE 

RABMI 

RABNO 

RABOP 

RABPU 

RABRY 

RABUR 

RACAN 

RACEN 

RACIP 



E-4 14 
£-415 
E-4 16 
E-417 
E-4 18 
E-4 19 
E-420 
E-421 
E-422 
E-423 
E-424 
E-4 2 5 



Bottom Head 

Tie Rod Nut 

Yoke 

Yoke Pin 

Pile Clamp Pin. . . 

Spacer 

Pile Clamp 

Pile Clamp Bolt. . . 

Taper Pin 

Side Strap Clamp. 
Cylinder Liner. . . 
Liner Dowel 



RACLA 

RACME 

RACNI 

RACOR 

RACPO 

RACRU 

RACSY 

RACUS 

RADNE 

RADEP 

RADAN 

RADIR 



81 



PILE EXTRACTORS 



CONTROLLED PULLING POWER 




(Above) New York City. McKiernan-Terry No. E-4 
Double-Acting Pile Extractor removing steel sheet piling 
used in the construction of the East River Drive. Con- 
tractor, Merritt-Chapman & Scott Corp. 

(Below, left) New York City. McKiernan-Terry No. E-2 
Double-Acting Pile Extractor, attached to a piece of 
steel sheet piling, ready to start driving upwards. Its 
powerful upworcf pull dislodges piling that otherwise 



would be most difficult to move. On the job here illus- 
trated, only one bolt is being used to connect extractor 
to sheeting; where pulling is more difficult another hole 
in the pile and two-pile bolt connection ore used. 

(Below, right) East St. Louis. McKiernan-Terry No. E-4 
Double-Acting Extractor pulling steel sheet piling driven 
as .a retoining wall in constructing a large municipal 
storm sewer. G. L. Tarlton, Inc., controctor. 




82 



COMPLETELY MODERN 
SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



For driving into very dense substances such as stiflf 
blue clay, heavy **gumbo*', incipient shale, hard pan, 
compacted gravel, etc., as well as for driving heavy 
mass piles — jobs where the benefit of the high-fre- 
quency blows of a double-acting pile hammer is not 
particularly advantageous — McKiernan-Terry Single- 
Acting Pile Hammers are meeting the most exacting 
operating conditions. 

This modern development in single-acting hammers 
actually embodies over half a century of research, 
study, experiment and field operation. While the name 
McKiernan-Terry has always been closely identified 
with the double-acting type of hammer, the Company 
has also, through the years, been building a certain 
number of single-acting hammers to meet special 
needs. As long ago as 1934 McKiernan-Terry produced 
single-acting pile hammers for operations in the devel- 
opment of Pearl Harbor. 

That valuable experience, together with the experi- 
ence gained in many years of producing constantly im- 
proved double-acting hammers, has been the back- 
ground for the introduction of the completely modern 
single-acting pile hammers described on the following 
pages. 

Operators know that in driving heavy mass piles, 
such as concrete, and driving where the soil offers 
severe resistance, a hammer must deliver heavy blows 
with a heavy-mass ram, but at a lower rate of speed in 
feet-per-second travel of ram at point of impact than 
is usual with double-acting hammers. 



The single-acting principle makes possible the use 
of very heavy rams with the minimum amount of 
boiler horsepower or compressed air. Furthermore, 
the ram has large striking area — double that of the 
usual single-acting hammer — thus distributing the 
blow over a greater area, greatly increasing its effec- 
tiveness and reducing wear of the ram and anvil. The 
same principles of control that govern the constant, 
uniform strokes of McKiernan-Terry Double- Acting 
Hammers are employed in the Single- Acting Hammers. 

In batter work, McKiernan-Terry Single-Acting 
Pile Hammers deliver more evenly distributed, more 
effective blows than has been hitherto possible with 
single-acting hammers. The bottom cylinder is an all- 
enclosing guide for the ram. 

The valve assembly — often called "the heart of the 
hammer" — is similar to the very efficient valve as- 
sembly used in McKiernan-Terry Double- Acting Ham- 
mers. It has a double-contact, sliding-type oscillating 
action and is completely enclosed against entrance of 
grit, sand or other foreign matter always present on a 
pile driving job. This gre^atly reduces wear. The entire 
hammer mechanism, in fact, is enclosed. No working 
parts are exposed, thus reducing operating hazards. 

McKiernan-Terrys are the only single-acting ham- 
mers that can be operated under water. Thus shorter 
piles can be used, conserving labor, material and ex- 
pense. This underwater feature alone puts McKiernan- 
Terry Single-Acting Pile Hammers in a class by them- 
selves. 



VITAL McKIERNAN-TERRY 

1. Built of highest quality heat-treated alloy steel 
forgings and heat-treated alloy steel castings. 
Steam cylinders of cast meehanite, that strong, 
close-grained metal famous for long wear. Welded 
steel bottom cylinders. 

2. The only single-acting hammers than can perform 
underwater work. 

3. Completely enclosed — all working parts pro- 
tected from sand, grit, foreign matter. 

4. No exposed working parts — reducing hazards to 
workers. 

5. Piston and ram are heat-treated alloy steel forg- 
ings. Ram has larger striking area — making for 
less wear and fatigue on striking end of ram — 
making blows more effective. 



SINGLE-ACTING FEATURES 

6. Anvils are heat-treated steel castings, supported 
to hammer by cables, facilitating quick change. 

7. Double-contact, sliding type, oscillating valve 
mechanism— smooth action — no impact on valve. 

8. Easy to disassemble — parts separate into self- 
contained units. 

9. Strokes are constant — all blows uniform in 
energy. 

10. Operate on either steam or air, without change, 
except in lubrication. 

11. More effective for batter work — better fitting 
guides distribute blows more evenly. 

12. Backed by engineering development since 1897. 



83 



SINCIE-ACTING PILE HAMMEiS 



>3i 



One of two McKiernan-Terry No. S-14 
Single<Acting Pile Hammers believed to be 
the heaviest ram hammers yet constructed. 
Used for driving 192-foot steel H-beam 
piles to 85 feet under water in the con- 
struction of the 10,050-foot Potomac River 
bridge at Ludlow Ferry, Md. See pages 4, 
105, 106 and 107 for other pictures. Total 
weight, hammer and anvil, 31,800 lbs. 
Ram alone 14,000 lbs. Overall height 16 
feet 7 inches. 



84 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



WORLD'S LARGEST PILE HAMMER 



The giant McKiernan-Terry S-l4 Single- Acting Pile 
Hammer shown on the opposite page was designed and 
built to handle a series of specific and difficult prob- 
lems in pile driving. Not the least of these was the 
penetration of difficult substances. 

A stratum of rock at a fairly uniform depth of 190 
feet below the surface of the river was overlaid by 10 
to 20 feet of stiff, sandy clay. Above this was a layer 
of stiff clay 10 to 40 feet thick, topped with sand and 
sand-clay mixture to a depth of 25 to 75 feet. And all 
was topped with 26 to 40 feet of exceedingly soft river 
mud. The depth of water ranged from 1 foot to 11 
feet under the trestle to 11 to 74 feet beneath the 
bridge proper. 

It was obvious that this type of river bottom was 
such as to nullify the value of the high-frequency blows 
of a double-acting hammer. Through this dense, resist- 
ant soil, steel sheet piling ranging from 92 to 192 feet 
in length must be driven to refusal. 

The special McKiernan-Terry No. S-14 Single- Act- 
ing Hammer shown here was ordered for the job — in 
fact, two of these hammers. Capable of delivering a 
steady, flat blow of 37,500 foot-pounds, these hammers 
were the largest ever built. The floating pile driver 



from which they were operated was likewise the larg- 
est ever constructed. See photo on page 105. 

With this massive equipment a total of 37 miles of 
piling, including some of the longest piles ever used 
in bridge piers, were driven to form the long trestle 
approaches and the bridge's twenty piers. Extra long, 
telescoping leads permitted driving the tops of piles 
to 85 feet below water level, to support the pier plat- 
forms. This is one more example of the effectiveness 
of McKiernan-Terry hammers for — 

UNDERWATER PILE DRIVING 

On page 68 you will find information about the use 
of McKiernan-Terry Hammers for underwater driv- 
ing. This information applies not alone to McKiernan- 
Terry Double- Acting Hammers, but also to the Single- 
Acting Hammers described in the following pages. 
Pages 69 to 75 show photographs of underwater driv- 
ing done with McKiernan-Terry Double- Aaing Ham- 
mers. 

Detailed information about McKiernan-Terry Sin- 
gle- Acting Hammers, with photographs showing them 
at work, will be found on the pages immediately fol- 
lowing. 



85 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



SPECIFICATIONS OF McKIERNAN-TERRY SINGLE-ACTING HAMMERS 



HAMMER SIZE 



Bore, inches 

Stroke, feet 

Blows per minute 

Energy per blow, foot-pounds 

Size boiler required, (boiler h.p. at 12 sq. ft, of heating 

surface per boiler h.p.) 

Compressed air required, actual cubic feet 

Steam or air pressure required at hammer, pounds per 

sq. in, (See Note D) 

Recommended steam pressure at boiler, or air pressure 

at compressor, pounds per sq. in. (See Note D) . . . . 
Minimum size hose openings and connections from boiler, 

or compressor to hammer, inches 

Size of exhaust opening in hammer, inches 

Code word for hammer 



S-3 



lOVi 
3 

9,000 

25 

400 

80 
100 

3 
KUZIH 



$-5 



14 

3^4 

60 
1 6,250 

40 
600 

80 

100 

2 

KUZKU 



S-8 



17 
3!/4 

26,000 

60 
850 

80 

100 

2V% 
4 
KUZLY 



S-10 



17/2 
3^4 

32,500 

6S 
1,000 

80 

100 

214 
4 
KUZOK 



$-14 



20 

2% 
60 
37,500 

90 



100 

125 

3 

5 

KUZUL 



WEIGHTS - POUNDS 



Net weight, with flat or bell (cup) anvil, hammer only, 
pounds 

Shipping weight, hammer and fittings, pounds 

Weight of ram, pounds 

Cup anvil, Type 2, page 88 

Flat anvil. Type 1 , page 88 

H-beam anvil, Type 3, page 88, approx 

Sheet piling anvil. Type 3, page 88, approx 

Anvil for smooth butt concrete piles. Type 5, page 88, 
approx 

Anvil for concrete piles with extended reinforcing rods. 
Type 6, page 88 . 

Anvil for pipe piles. Type 4, page 88, approx 

For shipping weights, add to above net weights, approx. . 



9,030 
10,150 

3,000 
800 
800 
900 
900 

1,400 



1 2,460 
1 3,775 
5,000 
1,400 
1,375 
1,500 
1,500 

1,900 



1 8,300 
19,713 
8,000 
1,650 
1,600 
1,750 
1,750 

2,700 



22,380 
23,793 
10,000 
2,250 
2,200 
2,500 
2,500 

3,200 



31,700 
33,100 
1 4,000 
3,300 
3,200 
3,400 
3,400 

6,000 



Depends on size and number of rods and their length above 

pile butt 



940 
+ 100 



1,550 
+ 150 



1,900 
+ 200 



2,700 
+ 200 



3,600 
+ 300 



DIMENSIONS 



A— Length, center of sheave to bottom of hammer. . . 

B— Top of sheave to bottom of flat anvil 

C- Width 

D— Depth, without rope lugs 

E— Center line of hammer to rear of hammer. 

F — Maximum depth 

G — Maximum stroke 

H — Diameter of piston 

I — Anvil — large diameter of recess 1 

J — " — Small diameter of recess > See page 88 

K — " — max. dimensions, flat anvil) 

Cubic measurements, hammer with flat anvil, inches. . . 



ir-4" 

12'-4" 
20" 
26" 
16" 
32" 
3'.3" 
11" 
17" 
13" 
20" 
30x34x160 



12'-2" 
13'-3" 

24" 

30" 

18" 

36" 
3 '-6" 

14" 

20" 

16" 

24" 
36x38x174 



13'-3" 
14'-4" 

26" 

32" 

19" 

38" 
3 '-6" 

17" 

22" 

18" 

26" 
38x38x183 



13' 
14'-1" 

30" 

36" 

21" 

42" 
3 '-6" 

17/2" 

26" 

22" 

30" 
43x43x180 



13 '-7" 
14'.10" 

36" 

36" 

21" 

42" 
3' 

20" 

28" 

28" 

36" 
48x43x192 



NOTES: A— When ordering, be sure to specify whether hammer is to be operated with AIR or STEAM, so that lubricator of proper type may be furnished. 
B— When ordering hammer specify whether a standard flat or bell (cup) anvil is wanted. If other types of anvil or drive cap are required, these 
will be furnished ^\ additional cost, after receipt of complete specifications of piling to be driven. 
C— If angle iron guides are to be attached, give lead measurements A and B, as indicated on page 92. 

D— Figures for steam pressure at hammer and at boiler are approximate, given as a guide. Actual pressures required will vary with the weather, 
and with the installation of the boiler, length of steam line from boiler to throttle valve, and length of hose used. The actual steam pressure and vol- 
ume must be regulated by means of the throttle valve and by varying the steam pressure at the boiler so that hammer will run at speed indicated 
in table. Hammers must not be run faster than rated speed, nor, at such speed that the hammer is lifted off the pile on the up-stroke of the ram. 



86 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



DIMENSIONS OF McKIERNAN-TERRY SINGLE-ACTING HAMMERS 




Front •Isvation 



Side sectional •levation 



87 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



ANVILS FOR McKIERNAN-TERRY SINGLE-ACTING HAMMERS 




For pipe piles; 
size to suit piles^ 



For concrete piles with extended 
reinforcing rods. Holes to suit rods. 



For smooth butt concrete piles. Size and 
shape to suit octagonal or square piles. 



LARGEST PILE SIZES TO BE USED WITH STANDARD ANVILS 

Piles larger than shown in table require special anvils, wider than the width of the hammer. 
Leads must be wide enough to fit these special anvils. 



SIZE OF HAMMER 


S-3 


S-5 


S-8 


S-IO 


S-14 


Concrete piles — octagon or square. Special anvils furnished 
to fit any length, size or number of reinforcing rods, extend- 
ing beyond butt of pile, inches 


16 


20 


22 


26 


32 


Steel pipe piles— outside diameter, inches 


20 


24 


26 


30 


32 


Wood piles— inside diameter of cup. Larger piles must be 
chamfered to fit cup, inches 


13 


16 


18 


22 


28 


H-beams— inches 


24 


27 


30 


36 


36 


Steel sheet piling — grooves made to suit piling 






All sizes 






Concrete sheet piles 






All sizes 







88 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMEtS 



FORMULA FOR COMPUTING BEARING CAPACITY 

OF PILES DRIVEN BY SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



The "Engineering News" formula given below is 
simplest formula used by engineers to determine the 
safe bearing capacity of piles driven by McKiernan- 
Terry Single-Acting Pile Hammers. 

2 WH 



S + .l 
In this formula, 

L ^ Safe bearing capacity of pile in pounds, 
W = Weight of ram in pounds, 
H := Stroke, or fall, in feet. 



S = Set, or penetration, of pile in inches per blow. 
.1 ^ Constant 

The assumed safety factor of this formula is 6. 

The following illustration of the use of this formula 
is based on the No. S-5 McKiernan-Terry Single- 
Acting Pile Hammer running at 60 blows per minute, 
developing a 16,250- foot-pound blow: 



L = 



2 (5000 X 3.25) 2 X 16,250 



32,500 



S + .l 



S + .l 



s + .l 



BEARING CAPACITY OF PILES DRIVEN BY McKIERNAN-TERRY 
SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 

Based on the "Engineering News" Formula 



Penetration or Set 


No. S-3 at 


No. s-5 al 


No. S-8 at 


No. S-10at 


No. S-Uol 


per blow 


9,000 ft. lbs. 


16,250 ft. lbs. 


26,000 ft. lbs. 


32,500 ft. lbs. 


37,500 ft. lbs. 


Inches (S) 


per blow 


per blow 


per blow 


per blow 


per blow 


.1 


90,000 


1 62,500 


260,000 


325,000 


375,000 


.2 


60,000 


108,333 


173,333 


216,667 


250,000 


.3 


45,000 


81,250 


1 30,000 


1 62,500 


1 87,500 


.4 


36,000 


65,000 


1 04,000 


1 30,000 


1 50,000 


.5 


30,000 


54,166 


86,666 


108,333 


1 25,000 


.6 


25,714 


46,428 


74,285 


92,857 


107,143 


.7 


22,500 


40,625 


65,000 


81,250 


93,750 


.8 


20,000 


36,111 


57,778 


72,222 


83,333 


.9 


18,000 


32,500 


52,000 


65,000 


75,000 


1.0 


16,363 


29,545 


47,272 


59,090 


68,182 



89 



SINGli-ACTINC PILE HAMMERS 



PARTS FOR McKIERNAN-TERRY 



When ordering parts, 
be sure to give ham- 
mer size and, if pos- 
sible, serial number 
of hammer. 



Name ol Part 



Sheave (16" diameter). 

Sheave Shaft 

Wire Rope Guard Cap Screw. . 
Wire Rope Guard Lock Washer. 
Wire Rope Guard 



Top Head 

Tie Rod Nut 

Oil Reservoir 

Oil Reservoir Stud and Nut. 
Top Head Stud and Nut. . . 




Top Cylinder 

Valve 

Oil Strainer for Cam Rod Bearing . 

Valve Ring 

Oil Plug, 1% inch 



Drain Plug . . . , ^ . 
Air Inlet Plug .... 
Com Rod Bearing . 

Cam Rod 

Piston 



Piston Ring 

Intermediate Head. 

Packing 

Gland 

Gland Cap Screw. 



Gland Stud and Nut 

Bottom Cylinder 

Hand Hole Cover. 

Hand Hole Cover Gasket ...... 

Hand Hole Cover Stud and Nut. 



Ram . . 

Cam Throw 

Cam Throw Taper Pin. 

Ram Taper Pin 

Bottom Head 



Tie Rod 

Dowel Pin for Top Cylinder. . . , 
Dowel Pin for Bottom Cylinder . 
Exhaust Flange Stud and Nut. . 
Inlet Flange Stud and Nut 



Exhaust Flange Gasket . 
Inlet Flange Gasket. . . . 

Oil Plug, 2 inch 

Exhaust Flange, 3 inch. . 
Inlet Flange, 2 inch . . . . 



Housing for Oil Strainer (Com Rod Bearing) 

Plug for Oil Strainer (Valve V%' Allen) 

Oil Strainer (Valve) 

Plug for Oil Strainer Hole W^" Allen). . . . . . 

Gasket for Oil Strainer 



Oil Reservoir Gasket 

Top Head Gasket 

Angle Iron Guide Cap Screw & Lock Washer. 

Angle Iron Guide (Top) . . . . 

Angle Iron Guide (Bottom) 

Cable for Anvil Block 

Cable Clamp 

Exhaust Drain Plug 



Flat Anvil for General Use, Type 1 

Cup Anvil for Wood Piles, Type 2 g^g 

Anvil for H-beam or Sheet Piling, Type 3 

Anvil for Pipe Piles, Type 4 P°9e 

Anvil for Smooth Butt Concrete Piles, Type 5 gg 

Anvil for Concrete Piles with Reinforcing Rods Extending above Butts, Type 6 



Becket Assembly Complete . 



S-3 HAMMER 



Part 



S-3-1 
S-3-2 
S-3-3 
S-3-4 
S-3-5 



S-3.6 
S-3-7 
S-3-8 
S-3-9 
S-3-1 



S-3-1 1 
S-3. 12 
S-3- 13 
S-3-14 
S-3-1 5 



S-3-1 6 
S-3- 17 
S-3-18 
S-3- 19 
S-3.20 



S-3-21 
S-3-22 
S-3-23 
5-3-24 
S-3-25 



S-3-26 
5-3-27 
S-3-28 
S-3-29 
5-3-30 



S-3-3 1 
S-3-32 
S-3-33 
5-3-34 
5-3-35 



S-3-36 
S-3-37 
S-3-38 
5-3-40 
5-3-41 



5-3-42 
5-3-43 
5-3-44 
S-3-45 
S-3-46 



5-3-47 
5-3-48 
S-3-49 
5-3-50 
5-3-51 



5-3-52 
5-3-53 
S-3-54 
5-3-55 
5-3-56 
5-3-57 
S-3-58 
5-3-59 



5-3-60 
5-3-61 
S-3-62 
S-3-63 
5-3-64 
5-3-65 



No. 
R*q. 



2 
1 
1 
1 
10 



36 

4 
4 
4 
4 
1 



90 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



9Hc9(ie^maH'7eVuf 

SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



S-5 HAMMER 


$-8 


HAMMER 


S-10 


HAMMER 


S-14 HAMMER 


Part 


No. 




Part 


No. 




Port 


No. 




Port 


No. 




No. 


Req. 


Code 


No. 


Req. 


Code 


No. 


Req. 


Code 


No. 


Req. 


Code 


S-5-1 


2 


LAKRE 


S-8-1 


2 


LATID 


S-10-1 


2 


LEDAM 


S-14-1 


3 


LENEX 


S-5-2 


1 


LAKSI 


S-8-2 


1 


LATOF 


S-10-2 


1 


LEDEN 


8-14-2 


1 


LENIZ 


S-5-3 


4 


LAKTO 


S-8-3 


4 


LATUG 


S-10-3 


4 


LEDIP 











S-5.4 


4 


LAKWY 


S-8-4 


4 


LATZA 


S-10.4 


4 


LEDLA 











S-5-5 


1 


LALAS 


S-8-5 


1 


LAVAC 


8-10-5 


1 


LEDME 


S-14-5 


1 


LENOB 


S-5-6 


1 


LALET 


S-8-6 


1 


LAVBA 


8-10-6 


1 


LEDNI 


8-14-6 


1 


LENUC 


S-5-7 


4 


LALRA 


S-8-7 


4 


LAVCE 


S-10-7 


4 


LEDOR 


S-14-7 


4 


LENVA 


S-5-8 


1 


LALSE 


S-8-8 


1 


LAVDI 


S-10-8 


1 


LEDPO 


8-14-8 


1 


LENWE 


S-5-9 


4 


LALH 


S-8-9 


4 


LAVED 


8-10-9 


4 


LEDRU 


S-14-9 


4 


LENXi 


S-5-1 


8 


LALUX 


S-8-1 


6 


LAVFO 


S-10-10 


8 


LEDSY 


S-14-10 


11 


LENZO 


s-5-n 


1 


LALVO 


8.8-11 


1 


LAVGU 


S-10-1 1 


1 


LEDUS 


8-14-11 


1 


LEPAX 


S-5.12 


1 


LALXY 


S-8-1 2 


1 


LAVHY 


8-10-12 


1 


LEFAN 


S-14-12 


1 


LEPBO 


s-5-1 3 


1 


LAMAT 


S-8-1 3 


1 


LAVIF 


S-10-13 


1 


LEFEP 


8-14-13 


1 


LEPCU 


S-5-14 


2 


LAMOX 


S-8-1 4 


2 


LAVOG 


8-10-14 


2 


LEFtR 


8-14-14 


3 


LEPDY 


S-5-1 5 


1 


LAMSA 


S-8-15 


1 


LAWAD 


S-10-15 


1 


LEFMA 


S-14-15 


1 


LEPEZ 


S-5-1 6 


2 


LAMTE 


S-8-1 6 


2 


LAWCA 


S-10-1 6 


2 


LEFNE 


8-14-16 


2 


LEPIB 


S-5-1 7 


1 


LAMZY 


S-8-17 


1 


LAWDE 


8-10-17 


1 


LEFOS 


S-14-17 


1 


LEPOC 


S-5-1 8 


2 


LANAV 


S-8-18 


2 


LAWEF 


S-10-1 8 


2 


LEFPl 


S-14-18 


2 


LEPUD 


S-5. 19 


1 


LANBY 


S-8-1 9 


1 


LAWFI 


8-10-19 


1 


LEFRO 


S-14-19 


1 


LEPWA 


S-5-20 


1 


LANIX 


S-8-20 


1 


LAWGO 


S-10-20 


1 


LEFSU 


S-14-20 


1 


LEPXE 


S-5-2 1 


2 


LANOZ 


S-8-21 


2 


LAWHU 


8-10-21 


2 


LEFTY 


8-14-21 


2 


LEPZI 


5-5-22 


1 


LANTA 


S-8-22 


1 


LAWIG 


S-10-22 


1 


LEFUT 


8-14-22 


1 


LERAZ 


S-5-23 


4 


LANWi 


S-8-23 


4 


LAWKY 


8-10-23 


4 


LEGAP 


S-14-23 


4 


LERBI 


S-5-24 


1 


LANXO 


S-8-24 


1 


LAWOH 


S-10-24 


1 


LEGIS 


8-14-24 


1 


LERCO 


S-5-25 


2 


LANZU 


S-8-25 


2 


LAXAF 


8-10-25 


2 


LEGNA 


S-14-25 


2 


LERDU 


S-5-26 


2 


LAPBU 


S-8-26 


2 


LAX DA 


S-10-26 


2 


LEGOT 


8-14-26 


4 


LEREB 


S-5-27 


1 


LAPCY 


S-8-27 


1 


LAXEG 


8-10-27 


1 


LEGPE 


S-14-27 


1 


LERFY 


S-5-28 


1 


LAPEX 


S-8-28 


1 


LAXFE 


S-10-28 


1 


LEGRI 


S-14-28 


1 


LERIC 


S-5-29 


1 


LAPIZ 


S-8-29 


1 


LAXGI 


S- 10-29 


1 


LEGSO 


S- 14-29 


1 


LEROD 


S-5-30 


10 


LAPOB 


S-8-30 


10 


LAXHO 


8-10-30 


10 


LEGTU 


S- 14-30 


10 


LERUF 


S-5-31 


1 


LAPUC 


S-8-3 1 


1 


LAXIH 


S- 10-31 


1 


LEGVY 


S- 14-31 


1 


LERXA 


S-5-32 


1 


LAPVA 


S-8-32 


1 


LAXKU 


8-10-32 


1 


LEHAR 


S-14-32 


1 


LERZE 


S-5-33 


1 


LAPWE 


S-8-33 


1 


LAXOK 


5-10-33 


1 


LEHES 


8-14-33 


1 


LESAB 


S-5-34 


1 


LAPXI 


S-8-34 


1 


LAXUL 


S-10-34 


1 


LEHIT 


S- 14-34 


1 


LESBE 


S-5-35 


1 


LAPZO 


S-8-35 


1 


LAZAG 


8-10-35 


1 


LEHPA 


8-14-35 


1 


LESCI 


S-5-36 


4 


LARAX 


S-8-36 


4 


LAZEH 


S-10-36 


4 


LEHRE 


8-14-36 


4 


LESDO 


S-5-37 


2 


LARBO 


S-8-37 


2 


LAZFA 


8-10-37 


2 


LEHSI 


8-14-37 


2 


LESEG 


S-5-38 


2 


LARCU 


S-8-38 


2 


LAZGE 


8-10-38 


2 


LEHTO 


8-14-38 


2 


LESFU 


S.5-40 


8 


LARDY 


S-8-40 


8 


LAZHl 


8-10-40 


8 


LEHWY 


S-14-40 


8 


LESGY 


S-5-41 


4 


LAREZ 


S-8-41 


4 


LAZIK 


8-10-41 


4 


LEKAS 


8-14-41 


8 


LESID 


S-5-42 




LARIB 


S-8-42 




LAZKO 


S-10-42 


1 


LEKET 


S-14-42 




LESOF 


S-5-43 




LAROC 


S-8-43 




LAZLU 


8-10-43 


1 


LEKRA 


S-14-43 




LESUG 


S-5.44 




LARUD 


S-8-44 




LAZMY 


8-10-44 


1 


LEKSE 


8-14-44 




LESZA 


S-5-45 




LARWA 


S-8-45 




LAZOL 


8-10-45 


1 


LEKTI 


S-14-45 




LETAC 


S-5-46 




LARXE 


S-8-46 




LEBAK 


S- 10-46 


1 


LEKUX 


8-14-46 




LETBA 


S-5-47 




LARZl 


S-8-47 




LEBEL 


S- 10-47 


1 


LEKVO 


8-14-47 




LETGE 


S-5-48 




LASAZ 


S-8-48 




LEBHA 


8-10-48 


1 


LEKXY 


8-14-48 




LETDI 


S-5.49 




LASBI 


S-8-49 




LEBIM 


8-10-49 


1 


LELAT 


S- 14-49 




LETED 


S-5-50 




LASCO 


S-8-50 




LEBKE 


S- 10-50 


1 


LELOX 


8-14-50 




LETFO 


_ S-5-5 1 




LASDU 


S-8-5 1 




LEBLI 


8-10-51 


1 


LELSA 


S- 14-51 




LETGU 


S-5-52 




LASEB 


S-8-52 




LEBMO 


8-10-52 


1 


LELTE 


S-14-52 




LETHY 


S-5-53 




LASFY 


S-8-53 




LEBON 


8-10-53 


1 


LELUZ 


8-14-53 




LETIF 


S-5-54 


36 


LASIC 


S-8-54 


36 


LEBPY 


8-10-54 


36 


LELVI 


8-14-54 


44 


LETOG 


S-5-55 




LASOD 


S-8-55 




LEBUP 


S-10-55 


4 


LELWO 


8-14-55 


4 


LETUH 


S-5-56 




LASUF 


S-8-56 




LEGAL 


8-10-56 


4 


LELZY 


8-14-56 


4 


LEVAD 


S-5-57 




LASXA 


5-8-57 




LEGEM 


8-10-57 


4 


LEMBY 


8-14-57 


4 


LEVGA 


S-5-58 




LASZE 


S-8-58 




LEGIN 


S-10-58 


4 


LEMEN 


8-14-58 


4 


LEVDE 


_ S-5-59 


1 


LATAB 


5-8-59 


1 


LECKA 


S- 10-59 


1 


LEMIX 


8-14-59 


1 


LEVEF 


S-5-60 




LATBE 


S-8-60 




LEGMI 


S-10-60 




LEMOZ 


8-14-60 




LEVFI 


S-5-6 1 




LATCI 


5-8-61 




LECNO 


S-10-61 




LEMTA 


8-14-61 




LEVGO 


S-5-62 




LATDO 


S-8-62 




LECOP 


8-10-62 




LEMXO 


8-14-62 




LEVHU 


S-5-63 




LATEC 


S-8-63 




LEGPU 


S- 10-63 




LEMZU 


8-14-63 




LEVIG 


5-5-64 




LATFU 


S-8-64 




LEGRY 


8-10-64 




LENBU 


S-14-64 




LEVKY 


S-5-65 




LATGY 


5-8-65 




LECUR 


S-10-65 




LENCY 


8-14-65 




LEVOH 























S- 14-70 




LEVUK 




Sheave, sheave stand and Becket 
arrangement for S-14 only 




91 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS 

FOR McKIERNAN -TERRY SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



1' 



m 



Cross-section of 
hammer, show- 
ing method of 
attaching angle 
Iron guides to 
side of hammer 



w 



A-LEADS RECOMMENDED 

The use of leads to guide the hammer in driving is 
recommended. Driving without leads usually results 
in misalignment of the hammer with the pile, causing 
excessive wear or breakage of the striking end of the 
ram and the anvil, as well as possible damage to 
the piling. 

B-AHACHING ANGLE IRON GUIDES 

Angle iron guides are furnished with each hammer 
to guide the hammer in the leads. If it is desired to 
____________________ have these guides at- 

tached to the ham- 
mer at the factory, 
this will be done 
at no additional 
charge. However, if 
guides are to be at- 
tached at the factory 
dimension B of your 
leads must be fur- 
nished when order- 
ing the hammer, 
keeping in mind that 
dimension A of your 
leads must be at 
least % inch greater 
than the width of 
the hammer which width is given in dimension table, 
page 86. 

On the other hand, if guides are not required to be 
attached at the factory, but at a later date it is desired 
to attach them or any other fixtures to the hammer, it 
will be necessary to send for dimensional detailed 
print showing exactly where and how to attach the 
angle iron guides, at the same time specifying the size 
hammer to which they are to be attached. The guides 
should be spaced 1/2 inch wider back to back than the 
width B shown in illustration above of the faces of 
the leads. 

The guides are furnished unattached unless the di- 
mension for spacing of the guides is specified when 
ordering hammer. 

Guides are attached to hammer with cap screws so 
that the rear guides may be removed to facilitate plac- 
ing the hammer in the leads. 

C-HOSE CONNECTIONS 

The size hose specified for each hammer should al- 




Measurements necessary in specifying 
angle iron guides 



ways be used. Use of a smaller size than that specified 
may result in the hammer not running up to the rated 
number of blows per minute. 

The hose should be connected to the steam inlet 
flange. Correct fittings, consisting of a nipple and an 
elbow, are furnished with each hammer. Universal 
joints for connecting hose to the hammer are recom- 
mended, but are not furnished as standard equipment. 

Before connecting hose to steam inlet, the hose 
should be thoroughly blown out with steam or air. 

The operation of the hammer will be improved if a 
drain cock or valve is installed in the steam line as near 
to the hammer as possible, so that condensed steam 
may be blown out before starting to drive each pile. 

Do not use wornout hose. Pieces of rubber or lining 
may gtt blown into the hammer and clog ports or 
valve. 

D-PRECAUTIONS AGAINST WEAR, DAMAGE 
AND BREAKAGE 

1. Use adequate lubrication with the right kind of 
oil. 

2. Keep hammer in line with pile. 

3. Keep full weight of hammer on pile while 
driving. 

4. Do not use excessive steam or air pressure, as it 
will cause hammer to over-stroke and lift oflf pile on 
up-stroke. 

5. Do not continue to drive on piles at refusal. Con- 
tinued driving on piles which have stopped moving 
will damage piles and break hammer parts. 

6. Do not use full power of hammer when starting 
piles or during very easy driving. 

7. Keep tie rod nuts tight. 

E-STARTING DIRECTIONS 

A cold hammer should be warmed up slowly, by 
cracking the throttle valve and admitting steam or air 
to the cylinder, so that the hammer will run slowly 
and the ram make short strokes. In cold weather a 
large amount of steam will condense in the steam line 
and hose and inside the hammer. This condensate or 
water must be worked through the hammer before 
running hammer at full speed. 

When starting a pile and during easy driving, the 
hammer should be run slowly with short strokes, so 
that the pile will not be driven out from under the 
hammer causing damage to the tie rods and drive cap. 

The full weight of the hammer must rest on the pile 
while the pile is being driven. The hoisting line must 



92 



SINGIE-ACTING PIIE HAMMERS 



I 



be kept slack at all times while the pile is being driven, 
so that the ram will not strike the retainer and damage 
the hammer. 

Continued operation of the hammer when the full 
weight of hammer is not resting on the pile will cause 
breakage of the tie rods and separation of the piston 
from the ram. 

F-DISASSEMBLING HAMMER 

To take hammer apart, remove the four tie rod nuts. 
Lift off top head and top cylinder in one piece. Remove 
valve from top cylinder. Lift out cam rod. Place eye- 
bolt in top of piston. Lift piston, ram and intermediate 
head out of bottom cylinder in one piece. Do not re- 
move piston or cam throw from ram unless necessary 
to make repairs. Reverse above operations to re- 
assemble hammer. 

G-PACKING PISTON 

Square packing, Garlock #15 or #777, is recom- 
mended to pack the piston. 

For size S-3 hammer use four rings of 5/8-^"^- square 
packing. 

For sizes S-5, S-8 and S-10 hammers use four rings 
of %-in. square packing. 

For size S-l4 use four rings of 1-in. square packing. 

Do not use more than jour rings. 

Gland stud nuts should be made up evenly, so that 
gland will exert even pressure on the packing. Gland 
should compress packing very lightly. Packing will be 
kept tight by steam pressure. Severe compression will 
cause undue wear of packing and hinder free move- 
ment of the piston. Gland nuts must be made fast with 
wire to prevent their working loose when hammer is 
driving, 

H-CARE OF HAMMER IN TRANSIT AND 
WHEN NOT IN SERVICE 

Plug inlet and exhaust to keep dirt out of hammer. 

If hammer is to be out of service for a period under 
three months detach hose and pour one quart of oil 
down hose. Reattach hose and run hammer for several 
strokes to flush oil through hammer. Drain water 



which may have condensed in cylinder by removing 
drain plugs. Replace plugs to prevent entry of dirt. 

If hammer is to be out of serv- 
ice for a period over three 
months take hammer apart, dry 
all parts, thoroughly coat them 
with oil and reassemble. 

I-COLD WEATHER 
PRECAUTIONS 

When hammer is not being 
used during cold weather, all 
water should be drained out of 
the top cylinder by removing 
drain plugs. Failure to drain 
cylinder may result in cracking 
of the cylinder due to freezing. 

J-INSTRUCTIONS FOR 
UNDERWATER DRIVING 

Illustration at right shows 
method of attaching the air in- 
let hose to bottom cylinder 
which is necessary for under- 
water driving with McKiernan- 
Terry Single-Acting Hammers. 

It is highly recommended that 
a lubricator be placed on the air 
line connected to the bottom 
cylinder and the same oil used 
as suggested for the steam line. 
(See page 94.) 

The exhaust line must be car- 
ried to the surface of the water. 
Use exhaust hose of at least 

the size recommended in specification table, page 86; 
but for submergence greater than approximately 15 
feet, use even larger hose — as large as possible. 

About 60 cubic feet of compressed air per minute 
is sufficient volume for any size hammer, and about 
y2-lb. pressure for every foot of submergence. 

All hose should be kept out of water as much as 
possible, and free of kinks or bends. 



Air inlet hose attached 
for underwater driving 



LUBRICATION -PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW CAREFULLY 



Adequate lubrication is absolutely necessary for sat- 
isfactory operation of McKiernan-Terry Single- Acting 
Pile Hammers. Insufficient oil or use of the wrong 
kind of oil causes shutdowns, excessive wear and costly 
repairs. 

All McKiernan-Terry Single- Acting Hammers will 
operate on either steam or compressed air. No changes, 



except in lubrication, are necessary in changing from 
steam to air. 

K-TO LUBRICATE STEAM-OPERATED 
HAMMERS 

A Swift Sight- Feed Lubricator for steam operation 
— see page 94 — is furnished with each McKiernan- 



93 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




Sight-feed lubricator for steam operation 

Terry Single-Acting Pile Hammer, but any standard 
sight-feed lubricator, if properly installed and oper- 
ated, will do. 

The purpose of the lubricator is to supply oil to the 
steam so that it is carried inside the hammer to lubri- 
cate piston and steam cylinder. The lubricator should 
be carefully installed as per directions, and must be 
kept filled and in operation while the hammer is 
running. 

L-HOW TO INSTALL STEAM LUBRICATOR 

The lubricator should be placed on the steam line 
back of the throttle valve; that is, between throttle 
valve and boiler. The connection from lubricator to 
steam line should be made through a tee, with the oil 
outlet pipe P extending into the center of the steam 
line. 

Be sure that the oil outlet pipe P (see illustration 
above) extends all the way into the flow of steam and 
is at right angles to the flow. 

This is necessary so that steam passing through the 
line will carry oil in the center of the hose and not 
along the sides. 

Never mount lubricator at a bend in the steam line 
where the flow of steam will strike the oil outlet pipe 
P head-on, as this will cause lubricator to work inter- 
mittently. 

M-HOW TO OPERATE STEAM LUBRICATOR 

Close valves E and G. Remove filler plug F and fill 
oil reservoir full to very top, and replace F. The bright 
nickel-silver plate showing the sight feed O will now 
be completely covered with oil. 

Open valve E about one-half turn, then allow five or 
ten minutes, on a new installation, for steam to con- 



dense and form the water column. Then open valve G 
very carefully. Drops of water will commence to roll 
down over the bright plate. Each drop will cause a 
drop of oil to be forced into the steam line. 

Valve G should he regulated to give at least one 
drop of oil to every ten blows of the hammer. Avoid 
opening valve G too wide. It water runs in a stream, 
instead of in drops, oil will he wasted. 

When the oil in the reservoir is nearly exhausted 
water will commence to show at the bottom of sight- 
feed O, gradually rising and showing on the sight-feed 
plate. Although there will be still enough oil to run 
for some time, it is best to refill when the water shows. 

To refill reservoir, close valves E and G to shut off 
lubricator from steam lii^e, open I and remove plug F 
to drain off water. Then proceed to refill as above. 
When hammer is not operating, valve G should al- 
ways be closed. 

If the lubricator is connected in such a way as to 
cause variable pressure, better results can be obtained 
by closing valve E to about the same opening as valve 
G, making the adjustment after lubricator has com- 
menced feeding. 

If the bright sight-feed plate should become dull or 
tarnished, a little silver polish on a cloth will quickly 
restore its original luster. 

If lubricator should become clogged from impuri- 
ties in the oil, remove filler plug F and sight-feed 
nut O. Then open valves G and E and the steam pres- 
sure will clear the passages. Don*t fail to do this 
should lubricator fail to work properly, as dirt in the 
passages will hinder the working of any lubricator. 

In cold weather drain lubricator by opening I when- 
ever hammer is not being used. 

N-OIL FOR USE WITH STEAM 

Steam hammers are often required to run on wet 
steam, due to unavoidable operating conditions and 
the length of steam line and hose between boiler and 
hammer. Therefore we recommend high grade com- 
pounded steam cylinder oil containing 5% to 7% ani- 
mal oil. 

Oil of this type produces an emulsifying effect when 
in contact with moisture, and the resulting lather re- 
sists the tendency of wet steam to wash oil off the in- 
ternal moving surfaces of the hammer. Oil meeting 
the following specifications has proved successful un- 
der average conditions: 

Gravity — degrees API 22-25 

Pour Point — degrees Fahrenheit 10-40 

Flash Point — degrees Fahrenheit .525-590 

Viscosity — Saybolt seconds at 210 degrees. . . . 120-140 
Percentage of compounded oil — usually acid- 
less tallow or lard 5%-7% 



94 



^)HcKi€Anan-T€M4f 

SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



Typical oils meeting these specifications include So- 
cony- Vacuum Gargoyle Cylinder Oil 600- W Regular; 
Standard Oil of New Jersey Cylesso T-140; Texas 
Company Honor Cylindei; Oil; Gulf Oil Corporation 
Crystal Cylinder Oil B. 

O-TO LUBRICATE A\R OPERATED HAMMERS 

A Swift Sight- Feed Lubricator for compressed air is 
supplied with each McKiernan-Terry Single-Acting 
Hammer, to be used on the air line when hammer is 
operated on air. It is also used on the air line con- 
nected to bottom cylinder when hammer is operated 
in underwater driving. Note underwater instructions, 
Section J. 

p_HOW TO INSTALL AIR LUBRICATOR 

The lubricator should be placed on the steam line 
back of the throttle valve; that is, between throttle 

valve and boiler. The con- 
nection from lubricator to 
steam line should be made 
through a tee, with the oil 
outlet pipe P extending 
into the center of the 
steam line. 

Be sure that the oil out- 
let pipe P extends all the 
way into the flow of steam 
and is at tight angles to 
the flow. 

This is necessary so that 
steam passing through the 
line will carry oil in the 
center of the hose and not 
along the sides. 

The illustration (left) 
shows correct method of installing lubricator in air line. 
Never mount lubricator at a bend in the steam line 
where the flow of steam will strike the oil outlet pipe P 
head-on, as this will cause lubricator to work inter- 
mittently, 

Q-HOW TO OPERATE AIR LUBRICATOR 

Close valves A and B. Remove cover C and fill oil 
reservoir. Replace cover C and open valve B. Then 
open valve A very carefully and regulate it to give at 
least one drop of oil to every ten blows, of the ham- 
mer. When lubricator needs refilling, close valves A 
and B, remove cover C and repeat above operation. 

It is necessary that a steady supply of oil be fed into 
the air line whenever hammer is in operation. Opera- 
tion without oil for even a brief period may cause seri- 
ous damage to the hammer. 




Air lubricator 



R-OILS FOR USE WITH AIR 

The oils recommended for steam operation should 
not be used when the hammer is operated on air, be- 
cause they are too heavy and sticky unless heated by 
steam. Oil of approximately the following specifica- 
tions is recommended for air-driven hammers: 

Gravity — degrees API 17-28 

Pour Point — degrees Fahrenheit to -10 

Viscosity — Say bolt seconds at 210 degrees. . 48-60 
Percentage of compounded oil to 3% 

The following brands of oil have been used success- 
fully in air-driven hammers: Socony- Vacuum Gar- 
goyle D.T.E. Heavy Medium; Gulf Oil Corporation 
Harmony Oil D or Seneca Oil B; Texas Company Ursa 
Oil C; Standard Oil of New Jersey Teresso 52. 

S-OILS FOR UNDERWATER DRIVING 

See instructions for underwater driving, Section J, 
page 93. Hammers operate on very wet steam under 
water, due to the cold water in contact with the steam 
hose and outside surfaces of hammer. This causes 
steam to condense, with the result that a large amount 
of water is carried along with the steam. 

This excess water makes it necessary to use a cylin- 
der oil containing 10% to 12% compound animal oil, 
in order to insure that oil will adhere to the moving 
parts, 

Socony- Vacuum Gargoyle P. E. Cylinder Oil Dark 
and similar oils containing 11% compounded lard 
have proved successful and are recommended for 
underwater use. 

T-INTERNAL 
LUBRICATION 

Oil reservoir A at top 
of valve and oil reservoir 
B in the face of the steam 
cylinder — see illustration 
at right — should be kept 
filled with the oil recom- 
mended above. Reservoir 
A oils the valve. Reservoir 
B oils the cam rod bear- 
ings, cam rod, and cam 
throw. 

As the oil in these res- 
ervoirs drips out steadily, 
whether the hammer is in 
operation or not, the res- 
ervoirs should be com- 
pletely filled at start of 
driving, and refilled at 
least every hour the ham- 
mer is in operation. 




Location of oil reservoirf 



95 



SINGU-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




SINGLE-ACTING HAMMER IN FLORIDA 



Miami, Fla. McKiernan-Terry No. S-3 Single- 
Acting Pile Hammer used in constructing 
two state highway bridges on the cause- 
way between Miami and Miami Beach. 



A total of 572 8-inch bearing piles 50 to 
96 feet in length were driven. Average 
depth of water 5 feet. Contractors, Ebsary 
Foundation Co. 



96 




SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



^d 



WIDENING 

A NATIONAL 

HIGHWAY 

Newark, N. J. McKiernan-Terry No. S-3 Single- 
Acting Hammer driving 25-foot creosoted tim- 
ber batter piles in the widening of U. S. Route 
22 highway crossing meadows south of 
Newark, E. O. Wickberg, contractor. 



97 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 






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98 



SINGIE-ACTING PIIE HAMMERS 



DRIVING INTO 
CORAL ROCK 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. McKiernan-Terry No. 
S-5 Single-Acting Hammer driving 16-inch 
square concrete piling for Florida State 
Highway. Piles 35 feet long were driven 25 
feet into coral rock. Contractors, Powell 
Brothers 




100 



StNGlEACTlNG PILE HAMMERS 



TEN ACRES OF 
CONCRETE PILES 



(Left and betow) Norfolk, Va. McKiernan- 
Terry No. S-8 Single-Acting Hammer drove 
a total of 5,386 pre-cast concrete piles 
averaging 14 tons each in constructing this 
10-acre cargo and warehouse pier for the 
Norfolk & Western Railway. McLean Con- 
tracting Co., contractors. 





REPAIRING 
A DAMAGED BRIDGE 

(Above) Pensacola, Fla. McKiernan-Terry 
No. S-8 Single-Acting Hammer driving 18- 
inch square reinforced concrete piling 90 
feet long, in repairing the badly damaged 
Thomas A. Johnson Bridge across Pensa- 
cola Bay. A total of 60 piles were driven 
approximately 60 feet through mud and 
hard marl to a bearing of 42 tons, all 
driven to given elevation without any 
cut-off. Contractors, Hardaway Contract- 
ing Co. 



101 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 




HANDLING 
CONCRETE 



San Francisco, Calif. McKiernan-Terry No. 
S-8 Single-Acting Hammer driving 18-inch 
concrete piling 60 to 80 feet long, in the 
construction of the Mission Rock Pier. Con- 
tractor, Clinton Construction Co. 



102 



SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



REPLACING TIMBER 
WITH TUBES 



Gautier, Miss. McKiernan-Terry No. S-10 
Single-Acting Hammer used in rebuilding 
the TS-span, single-track Louisville & Nash- 
ville Railroad bridge over the West Pas- 
cagoulo River. Spiral-vt/elded Armco pipe 
piles were used to replace the original 
timber piles of the bridge's 16 piers. A 
total of 256 80-foot piles, 24 inches in 
diameter, were driven through silt, cloy, 
gravel, into fine sand to penetrations of 
64 to 89 feet below water level. Moxon 
Construction Co., contractors. 




SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



SEVEN POSITIONS 
PER BENT 




Garrison, N. D. McKiernan-Terry No. S-TO 
Single-Acting Hammer driving 24-inch steel 
pipe piles for the T 350-foot rail and high- 
way bridge across the Missouri River at 
Garrison Dam. Operating from a floating 
rig with universal tilting leads and as- 
sembled with steel pontoons, this hammer 
drove bents of 15 100-foot piles for each 
of the 8 piers. In each group of piles, 3 
were driven vertically, 12 on a 4-to-12 
batter in 6 different directions to give 
maximum stability against scour, ice and 
floods. At each of the 6 deeper water 
piers, the 3 downstream piles were driven 
to a bearing load of 180 tons 70 to 80 feet 
into glacial till. All other piles were driven 
to 150 tons bearing. Missouri Valley Con- 
struction Inc. and Minston Bros. Co., joint 
contractors. 



104 



SINGIC-ACTING PILE HAMMEIS 



WORLD'S LARGEST 
FLOATING PILE DRIVER 

Ludlow Ferry, Md. McKiernon-Terry No. 
5-14 Single-Acting Hammer, operated from 
the world's largest floating pile driver, 
used in the construction of the Potomoc 
River bridge, described on page 85. The 
90-foot telescoping leads could be ex- 
tended 60 feet above the top of tower and 
95 feet below deck, permitting pile tops 
to be driven 85 feet below water level. 
See also page T07. Merritt-Chapman & 
Scott Corp., contractors. 




SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 



RECORD HAMMER IN ACTION 




Ludlow Ferry, Md. One of 2 huge McKiernan-Terry No. tKe TO,OSO.foof Potomac River bridge linking Maryland 

5-14 Single-Actmg Hammers driving steel H-beam bear- and Virginia. See also pages 4, 84, 85, 105 and 107 

mg piles, ranging in length from 92 to 192 feet, for Merritt-Chapman & Scott Corp., contractors 



106 



SINGLE-ACTING nil HAMMERS 



BIG HAMMER 

GOES TO 

SOUTH AMERICA 



Amuay Bay, Venezuela. McKiern an -Terry 
No. S-14 Single-Acting Hammer engaged 
in construcHng a large pier for the Creole 
Petroleum Corporation, driving box type 
piles welded to a length of 100 feet. This 
hammer, operated from the world's larg- 
est floating pile driver, is one of the two 
huge single-acting hammers described on 
pages 84 and 85. Merritt-Chapman & 
Scott Corp., contractors. Photo, Maurey 
Garber Studio. 




107 



StNGLE-ACTING PtU HAMMERS 







OVER TWO MILES OF CONCRETE PILES 




Indiana, near Evansvllle. A McKiernan-Terry No. 
S-14 Single-Acting Hammer, with 14,000-lb. ram, 
drove 2224 24-inch octagonal reinforced concrete 
piles for the major portion of the n,626-ft., 629- 
span Indiana approach to the Louisville & Nash- 
ville Railroad single-track bridge across the Ohio 
River at Henderson, Ky., on the main line between 
St. Louis and Louisville. Replacing an earlier tim- 
ber structure, 50-ft. concrete piles were driven 
into sand with some clay and fine gravel, without 
the use of a jet. After reaching 30-foot penetra- 
tion, piles were driven until a minimum of 10 
blows per inch were required to drive one foot; or 



if 30-foot penetration were not reached, piles 
were driven until 12 to 15 blows per inch were 
necessary for the last foot of penetration. Actual 
penetration varied from 25 to 35 feet, with a 20- 
ft. maximum difference per single bent. One re- 
markable feature of the job was the lack of spall- 
ing of concrete at the pile heads. Lower photo 
shows first train to cross the completed approach 
—the L. & N. Georgian No. 81. Work was under 
general direction of C. H. Blackman, chief engi- 
neer and J. C. Nichols, bridge engineer, with T. 
Clouse supervisor of bridges and buildings and 
J. W. Hoyt, resident engineer in direct charge. 



THcKif^^ft^i^'f^^ 



Plli DRIVING RIGS 



COMPLETE STEEL PILE DRIVING RIGS 

AND STEEL LEADS FOR ATTACHMENT TO CRANES 



McKiernan-Terry designs, engineers and manufactures 
complete pile driving rigs for use on land or water, 
designed for any specified pile driving conditions. 

We also manufacture steel pile driver leads for 
attachment to cranes. We supply these leads for fixed 
mounting on crane or shovel booms — suspended at 
boom point from top of leads, or at quarter point on 
leads extending above boom point, as shovvn in the 
lower left hand cut. Or we supply free hanging leads 
to be hung from a hook over the boom point sheave, 
as shown in cut at lower right hand corner of page. 

We are prepared to quote for and furnish complete 
pile driving rigs, as shown in the pages immediately 
following. These include the following types: 



Standard Fixed Leads; 
Pendulum Leads; 

Portable Pile Driver with Overhanging Leads; 
Fore-and-Aft Adjustable Batter Pile Leads; 
Full Revolving Pile Driver Leads, Fixed or Pen- 
dulum; etc. 

Any of the above pile driving rigs are obtainable 
mounted on skids or rollers or rail mounting for land 
driving; or barge mounting for water driving. They 
can also be furnished with telescopic extension for 
underwater driving. 

The pages immediately following show a number of 
different McKiernan-Terry Pile Driving Rigs of varied 
types, for land and marine driving. 




109 



PILE ORiVING RIGS 




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110 



PaE DRIVING RIGS 




McKIERNAN-TERRY 64-B-2 SKID ROLLER-MOUNTED PILE DRIVER 

Designed to work with McKiernan-Terry Hammer, the fixed leads are pin-connected, for ease in erection, as 
shown, and are provided with extra upper and lower sections. The rig is easily moved by rolling on the heavy 
steel oak-filled rollers, or skidded laterally when using the tackle provided and hoist winch heads for power. 



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rill DRIVING RIGS 



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1J9 



McKIERNAN-TERRY PRODUCTS 

DOUBLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS 

DOUBLE-ACTING PILE EXTRACTORS 

SINGLE-ACTING PILE HAMMERS PILE DRIVING LEADS 

COMPLETE PILE DRIVING UNITS MINE -QUARRY HOISTS 

HEAVY HOISTING AND SPECIAL CRANE EQUIPMENT 
MAN TROLLEYS COAL AND ORE BRIDGES GRAB BUCKETS 
HEAVY MATERIAL UNLOADERS 
SHIP AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT -STEERING GEARS 

CAPSTANS-WINCHES-WINDLASSES 

CABLEWAYS STEEL DERRICKS AND FITTINGS 

LIGHTER DERRICKS CAR PULLERS DREDGE ENGINES 

BRIDGE OPERATING MACHINERY 

POWER BLACKSMITH HAMMERS 

SPECIAL MACHINERY COMPLETELY DESIGNED, 
ENGINEERED AND MANUFACTURED 

SPECIAL MACHINERY MANUFACTURED FROM YOUR DESIGN 



McKIERNAN- TERRY CORPORATION 

Manufacturing Engineers 

SALES OFFICE: 15 PARK ROW, NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 

WORKS: DOVER, N. J. AND HARRISON, N. J. 

Distributors in Principal Cities 



PRINTED IN U.S.A. 



Prepared by 
MICHEL-GATHER. INC. 

Advertising 7500-49